In Never-Ending Relentless Pursuit of English Perfection for the ultra-prestigious Pulitzer

Modern Avante-Garde Unabridged "Total English" Exposition Literature in Shakespearean Poetic Academic: Hungary national football team of the 1950s-the 'Greatest Ever'.
Recommended Reading: Puskas on Puskas: The Life and Times of a Footballing Legend | Rogan P. Taylor (1998)

**Part II:** The Big International Matches of The Magical Magyars

**Part III:** 1954 World Cup Final & Three Other Big Matches

World Football Elo RatingsWorld Football Historic Center
George2.pngwritten by: the old vainglorious 19th & 20th Century Magyar Stadtholder, a great aficionado of football from the 'Old Boys Network'.
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God Bless Hungary.
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Hail the Scholars!
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The Seven Continent's Greatest Super-Athletic Olympian Nations ( 1896 - 2016 )
All-Time Summer Olympic Excellence by Weighted Medals per Capita*
World Rank
Country
Weighted Medals
Gold
Silver
Bronze
Population per Weighted Medals
No. 1
Hungary
1,162 pts.
175
147
168
8,573 persons
No. 2
Sweden
1,099 pts.
145
170
179
8,635 persons
No. 3
Australia
1,098 pts.
146
164
186
20,838 persons
No. 4
Great Britain
1,932 pts.
263
295
290
32,226 persons
No. 5
France
1,589 pts.
212
241
259
41,126 persons
No. 6
Italy
1,375 pts.
206
179
193
44,201 persons
No. 7
United States
6,380 pts.
1,021
795
706
49,119 persons

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* New York Times criteria (Nations with +1000 points: Gold = 4, Silver =2, Bronze =1)source: http://www.medalspercapita.com/#weighted-per-capita:all-time











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The "Golden Boys of the Systems", Ferenc Puskas & Billy Wright in Budapest, 1954. The incomparable Ferenc Puskas was football's first real world superstar, the Babe Ruth ('the Bambino') of 1st division and world football. Mr. Wright, the can-do Mr. Everything and great captain of England was the right player for his age and was the first international to reach 100 appearances for a national side. Puskas and Mr. Wright would both play three times against each other in Titanesque matches, the 'Match of the Century', the emphatic '7 - 1' return fixure in Budapest, and a internationally famous inaugural game, 'Wolverhampton vs. Honved' in December of 1954, that helped usher and inspire in the European Cup ('Champions League' tournament) the following year in 1955.
Europe's 20th Century All-Time Top Goalscorers in International Football

Rank
Star Player
Country
Goals
Appearances
Goal Ratio
Years Active
No. 1
Ferenc Puskas
Hungary
83
83
1.00
1945-1956
No. 2
Sandor Kocsis
Hungary
75
66
1.14
1948-1956
No. 3
Gerd Muller
Germany
68
62
1.10
1966-1974
No. 4
Imre Schlosser
Hungary
59
68
0.87
1906-1927
No. 5
Lajos Tichy
Hungary
51
72
0.71
1955-1971



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"The Natural", Sandor Kocsis, the greatest header of the ball who ever lived, and, by winning percentage and goal ratio in the world game, the most prominent player of the century. No player in history has had the exceptional and extraordinary year that Sandor Kocsis had in 1954 in his most advanced campaign where he won the "Quintuple Crown": I.) national league champion with Honved II.) domestic league goalscoring MVP, 33 goals III.) top goalscorer in the world in first-division football, world goalscoring MVP, 33 goals IV.) all-time most international goals in a single year, record-setter, 23 goals in 14 matches V.) goalscoring MVP of the 1954 World Cup, all-time most goals scored in the World Cup, 11 goals in 5 games (2.20 goals/match - history's highest average past 5 goals). Sandor Kocsis' combined scintillating club and unexcelled international performance and glory in a single year will probably never be equaled.

History's Projected All-Time Most Talent-Prolific Starting Lineup in Any Top-Tier International National MatchMay 8, 1955 Lausanne, Stade Olympique de la PontaiseHungary 5 : Switzerland 4 (Puskas scores winner in 85th min)

Star Player
End of career
international goals
All-Time Rank
1st Div. Scoring MVP
World Scoring MVP
League Titles
Ferenc Puskas
83
No. 2
8 MVP titles
1 World MVP
11 titles
Sandor Kocsis
75
tied No. 6
3 MVP titles
2 World MVP
7 titles
Lajos Tichy
51
tied No. 45
5 MVP titles
-
2 titles
Nandor Hidegkuti
39
tied No. 114
-
-
3 titles
Combined
248 International Goals
62 goals/player
(History's Highest Among Four Players)

16 MVP honors
3 World MVP
honors
23 national titles
Source: http://rsssf.com/miscellaneous/century.html#goals



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The elated 21st Century 'boys after their 2-0 tournament playoff win over Norway that brought them their first European Championship Cup appearance since 1972. The 'boys recorded a tremendous victory over Austria 2-0, drew Iceland 1-1 and tied eventual champions Portugal 3-3 to win their group.










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Simply the greatest! A footballing Avalon- the classic lineup of the Magical Magyar side: Kocsis-Budai-Zakarias-Lantos-Buzanszky-Bozsik-Czibor-Hidegkuti-Lorant-Grosics-Puskas (May 17th 1953 in Rome) the highest rated international team of all time. The 'Golden Team' went 49 wins, 9 draws, and 1 unwon (with the omission of the 1954 World Cup Final for a 98.3% undefeated percentage) over the course of six years that brandished a supremely bountiful and illustrious, nova offense in a class of its own that scored 4.36 goals per game at the sport's highest level. In translating association football scores to equate with American football (1 goal = 10 points), they would have scored 43.6 points/match on the gridiron at the topmost level of the professional game during a 59 game span while conceding 1.17 goals/game (11.7 points/game).

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Amsterdam, Olympic Stadium 1954. The Magical Magyars were the veritable masters of football and played games often of international import and heralded a six year reign to abound, beyond any precedent, in innovation and to record lusty victories over World Cup finalists Czechoslovakia (5-0, 2-1, 5-0, 5-1, 4-1, 3-1), Sweden (5-0, 6-0, 4-2, 7-3, 4-2), Yugoslavia (2-0, 3-1), Italy (3-0, 3-0, 2-0), England (6-3, 7-1), South Korea (9-0), West Germany (8-3), Brazil (4-2), Uruguay (4-2), Austria (6-1, 4-3, 4-3, 3-2, 1-0, 4-1, 6-1), Scotland (4-2, 3-1), France (2-1), East Germany (5-0), and the Soviet Union (1-0).
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Perfect Seasons by an Absolutely Crackerjack Side! The 1949-1956 Magical Magyars thoroughly dominated the game against the world's foremost elite teams. In clashes tremendous against the world's Top #12 teams, they decisively won 19 matches, drew 4 times, and lost none (with the omission of the 1954 World Cup Final). In translating this performance akin to the highest level of professional American football (1 goal = 10 points & w/ the omission of ties): against the world's top-tier class the Magical Magyars tallied a 19-0 record, sufficient for a completely perfect sweeping season while outscoring their opponents by +25.70 points on the topmost level of the gridiron.

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The big game against Austria on April, 1953 played in Budapest. The Magical Magyars boasted the famous forward line of Puskas-Kocsis-Hidegkuti, considered the greatest in international football history; their combined career goals tallied 197 scores. The Magical Magyars also fielded the first-place (Puskas, 83 goals) and second-place (Kocsis, 75 goals) record-holders for most world goals of the 20th Century in '55 and '56. The Magical Magyars contained the three of the world's four most victorious players who have scored at least 35 goals: 1.) Sandor Koscis - 52 wins, 4 draws, 4 losses (86.36 winning %), 2.) Nandor Hidegkuti - 53 wins, 7 draws, 7 defeats (84.33 winning %), and 4.) Ferenc Puskas - 63 wins, 10 draws, 10 defeats (81.93 winning %) for inarguably the greatest offensive team at the international level which was also the most victorious, going on a consecutive 49 matches unbeaten run (with omission of the 1954 World Cup Final) in top-flight football from 1950 to 1956.


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Solid Gold! Ferenc Puskas, the greatest ever European player of the century and indisputably the greatest left-footed player of all-time leads out the Magical Magyars (the "Golden Team") for the 1954 World Cup Final. Hungary outscored West Germany 10-6 on aggregate in the tournament, and managed to outscore their opponents by an average of +3.4 goals per match.


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"There is no more illustrious history than the history of the Magyar nation .... the whole civilized world is indebted to Magyarland for its heroic deeds." - 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, addressing the Hungarian Parliament, Budapest, Hungary April 2 1910.

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"It's not enough to have talent, you also have to be Hungarian." - Robert Capa.
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Money Rain Hungary: another ground-breaking ceremony: "Let the good times roll!"

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Author: the old Ganzer, The Historian Emeritus, part time Astronomer, the Bobby Fischer Crackling (Dynamic) English, the Baron Eszterhazy of Baseball Bettors, the Robin Hood / A Crackerjack / A Safecracker of Las Vegas, the Oliver Twist of Treasure Hunters from San Diego, California ( 'Golden State', the land of the 1848-1849-1850ers).




The Golden Team (Hu: Aranycsapat; also known as the ' Magical Magyars ', the ' Marvelous Magyars ', the ' Magnificent Magyars ', or the ' Mighty Magyars ') refers to the trend-setting, renowned and record-breaking varsity Hungary national football team of the 1950s. In 1952 it gained the Olympic gold medal, in 1953 became Central European champion, in 1954 it was the finalist in the 1954 World Cup being appointed by FIFA as the ' Best Team of the Tournament '. It is praised, among other accomplishments, for being the team that re-invented football in the post-WWII era. We should think of the Golden Team's leading endowments of 'Total Football' (i.e socialist football), the 'withdrawn playmaking center-forward', the 4-2-4 formation, and a sweeping take-charge role for goalkeeping to be epoch-making in the matter of football's reinvention.


It is associated with a number of historically significant games of well-received publicity that includes the "Match of the Century" (England v. Hungary in 1953), the "Battle of Berne" (a 1954 World Cup quarterfinal v. Brazil), a 1954 World Cup semifinal with Uruguay ("The Greatest Game Ever Played") and the "Miracle of Berne" (the 1954 World Cup Final). Inflicting maiden defeats on perennial world powers England and Uruguay, one of the side's last unified actions consigned an obdurate Soviet Union team to their maiden defeat at home in a FIFA recognized match mere weeks before a spontaneous national uprising against the Soviets precipitated the breakup of the side.



The last surviving members of the 'Golden Team' in front of a commemorative train engine in an old Budapest station that onced housed the luxuriant carriages of the 'Orient Express' in earlier days.
The last surviving members of the 'Golden Team' in front of a commemorative train engine in an old Budapest station that onced housed the luxuriant carriages of the 'Orient Express' in earlier days.

The team's brilliance from the spring of 1950 lasted for six years until its partial meltdown after the ill-fated 1956 Hungarian Revolution that had developed as a deliberate revolt against communism — a flashpoint in the Cold War and a strikingly heroic, morally prestigious and consequential event viewed as having rent the first major blow against the panoply of the monolithic communist order. It is credited with directly leading to a future tense football that marked a new chapter in the game's tactical scope for positional fluidity thus rendering contemporary form and styles of the game outmoded. Manager Gustav Sebes with his players revolutionized on grounds analogous to the politics of socialism the new theory and practice of football and were the introducers of a modern type of ground game with its polyvalent quasi-4-2-4 offense with an early advocacy to the famous 360-degree ‘Total Football' strategy that later the Dutch football scene operated. The heirs to Hungary's 4-2-4 tactical shape were eventual world champions Brazilian teams who adopted, emulated and enriched their legacy for the 1958 and 1970 FIFA World Cups.


The ensemble was built around a core talent bureau of a half-a-dozen world-class players led by its talismanic captain Ferenc Puskás, prodigal goalscorer Sándor Kocsis, deep-lying centre-forward Nándor Hidegkuti, swift and sprightly winger Zoltán Czibor, midfield choreographer József Bozsik, who set the tenor for the tactical nous going forward, and a first rate goalkeeper in Gyula Grosics. The incomparable attacking nexus of Puskás—Kocsis—Hidegkuti brandished across their full careers a windfall of 197 goals and were critically considered by many to be the greatest forward line in history. The singular un-repeatable occasion of Puskás and Kocsis supplied history the first and only occasion where the first and second-place world record setters for most international goals were involved on the same side. Jenő Buzánszky, Mihály Lantos, Gyula Lóránt, and József Zakariás modeled a praiseworthy and oft-outperforming defense that played with a typical steadiness too little known.


A permanent exhibition that houses historic items of the team in Budapest, Hungary.
A permanent exhibition that houses historic items of the team in Budapest, Hungary.


Apart from the very controversial 1954 World Cup Final match, the team would suffer no defeats for six years, compiling 42 victories and 7 draws — a record that lifts the side into the sphere of legend. Under the World Football Elo Ratings system that ranks all national teams across the many given eras, they achieved the highest rating recorded in history by a national side (2192 points, June 1954). Their constant and essential hard currency was cogent offensive throughput within a 60 game period that leavened the sport with an astonishing 260 goals — averaging an outlay of 4.32 goals per game, and it was around these games that their golden age and supremacy was framed and their football attained its greatest intensity.



One of the most technically superb teams in history, by its striking number of victories, tactical renovation in company with its acclaimed matches, the side ranks as one of association football's most dominant forces of the 20th century. As the definitive sporting force from the Socialist Bloc of the era, it was also a tool used by communist authorities as a formidable newsworthy piece in the propaganda war with the Cold War West being held up as emblematic of socialist ideals by virtue of liberating the genius that lay dormant in the working class as a type of modern emblem of prestige and power. Its sporting prominence has not gone unremarked upon by postwar historians who noted its causal effect on West German and Hungarian political and socio-economic trends, and nationalistic streams of consciousness following one of the most famous of World Cup competitions in 1954.


Current evidence had surfaced in investigations both official and journalistic on the scholarly (University of Leipzig, Oct. 2010) and historical eye witness levels (Switzerland, 2004) giving widely held suspicions credence that the Hungarians' defeat in the 1954 World Cup Final match was referable to West Germany's use of performance-enhancing drugs and harsh uneven refereeing due to the eco-political zeitgeist of the times.


All-Time International Football Teams Rankings
Arpad Elo.jpg
Renowned mathematician Árpád Élő. In 1970, FIDE, the World Chess Federation, agreed to officially adopt the Elo Rating System. A derivative of his system was developed in 1997 for international football.

For the purposes of this writing, we will attempt to use ELO world football rankings, developed by Hungarian-American mathematician Árpád Élő and adapted for international football. No other ratings system, including FIFA Rankings, is as comprehensive in coverage from the game's beginnings into today. ELO ratings use an empirical formula that does not account for weighted historical averages, nor judge teams after penalty shootouts and immediately rewards teams that perform well against good teams. It is the purest form of attaining the relative scope for national teams that represents the very best estimates. ELO ratings cover all eras including the first international between Scotland and England in 1872 for all national sides into today. The ELO rating system accounts for all 'full internationals' between 'national teams' whether sanctioned by FIFA.


The following is a list of national football teams ranked by their highest Elo rating ever reached.

World Rank
Nation
Points
Date Set
No. 1
Germany
2205
July 13, 2014
No. 2
Hungary
2192
(highest of 20th Century)
June 30, 1954
No. 3
Brazil
2161
June 17, 1962
No. 4
Spain
2147
June 23, 2013
No. 5
Netherlands
2137
July 12, 2014
No. 6
Argentina
2128
April 3 1957
No. 7
France
2114
August 3 1957
No. 8
England
2112
Nov. 9 1912
No. 9
Italy
2073
July 20, 1939
No. 10
Poland
2045
Sept. 1 1974

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Football_Elo_Ratings#All-time_highest_ratings





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The Hungarian marriage of the century.



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From Hungary with Love, another remarkable Hungarian gifts and history-making inventions in America and to the big world, big business film-making in Hollywood, California. A legendary husband and wife team during the golden days of old Hungarian Hollywood, the incomparable Rosy Barsony and Oszkar Denes, sheer classic stardom.




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Two great and iconic Hungarian inventions in America: Hollywood giants Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox.

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Another truly great Hungarian Oscar award, Hollywood, California, America 2017.



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The 'boys June 7, 2016 before their departure for Euro 2016.





1949-1956 Hungary (7 years)
The Greatest Ever :
International Football's Strongest, Most Powerful, Most Inventive, Influential & Important, Most Revolutionary,Greatest Offensive and Indisputably Highest Rated No. 1 Team of All-Time
The BBC's/Supercomputer's Benchmarking and Rankings of the Greatest International Teams of All-Time
1949-1956 HungaryMay 8, 1949 - Feb. 18, 1956:


No. of Internationals
Wins
Draws
Losses
Winning Percentage:
Undefeated Percentage:
Goals/Match -
Goals Against =
Goal Difference/Match
Supercomputer's Appraisal & Ranking
59 matches*

in equiv. top-tier American football, 49-1 (43.6 points/game)
49
9
1
90.68%
98.31%
+4.36 gls/gm
-1.17 gls/gm
+3.19 gls/gm
Greatest Ever /
Highest Ever Rating
*does not include the 1954 World Cup Final match due to various controversies
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All-time Consecutive Games Undefeated for National Teams (with omission of the 1954 World Cup Final):

World Rank
Nation
Matches Undefeated
Date Began
Streak End Date

No. 1

Hungary
49 matches
June 4, 1950
February 19, 1956
2. tied
Spain
35
February 2, 2007
June 24, 2009
2. tied
Brazil
35
December 16, 1993
January 21, 1996
3.
Argentina
31
February 19, 1991
August 15, 1993
4.
France
30
February 16, 1994
November 9, 1996
5.
South Korea
28
September 3, 1977
March 4, 1979
6.
Columbia
27
July 31, 1992
April 7, 1994
7. tied
Italy
25
October 13, 2004
August 16, 2006
7. tied
Netherlands
25
September 10, 2008
July 11, 2010
source: http://rsssf.com/miscellaneous/unbeaten.html


1949-1956 HungaryMay 8, 1949 - Oct. 14, 1956:Versus the World's Elite National Teams* (World's Top #1 - #12 Ranked Teams)


Date
Venue / Type of Match
Opp.
Elo Rating
Game TimeWorld Elo Rank
Nation
Score
May 8 1949
home / Euro. Gero International Cup
1768
No. 12
Austria
6-1
June 12 1949
home / Euro. Gero International Cup
1940
No. 5
Italy
1-1
June 19 1949
away / friendly
1970
No. 2
Sweden
2-2
Nov. 20 1949
home / friendly
1943
No. 4
Sweden
5-0
July 21, 1952
neutral / 1952 Olympics Quarterfinal
1845
No. 5
Italy
3-0
July 28, 1952
neutral / 1952 Olympics Semifinal
1819
No. 12
Sweden
6-0
Aug. 2, 1952
neutral / 1952 Olympics Final
1894
No. 5
Yugoslavia
2-0
May 17, 1953
away / Euro. Gero International Cup Final
1813
No. 11
Italy
3-0
July 05, 1953
away / friendly
1806
No. 11
Sweden
4-2
Oct. 11, 1953
away / friendly
1814
No. 11
Austria
3-2
Nov. 25, 1953
away / friendly
1959
No. 3
England
6-3
April 11, 1954
away / friendly
1802
No. 11
Austria
1-0
May 23, 1954
home / friendly
1963
No. 4
England
7-1
June 20, 1954
neutral / 1954 World Cup Group
1909
No. 7
West Germany
8-3
June 27, 1954
neutral / 1954 World Cup Quarterfinal
2007
No. 3
Brazil
4-2
June 30, 1954
neutral / 1954 World Cup Semifinal
1979
No. 3
Uruguay
4-2
July 4, 1954
neutral / 1954 World Cup Final
2008
No. 3
West Germany
omitted
Nov. 14, 1954
home / friendly
1899
No. 7
Austria
4-1
April 24, 1955
away / Euro. Gero International Cup
1867
No. 7
Austria
2-2
Oct. 16, 1955
home / Euro. Gero International Cup
1863
No. 7
Austria
6-1
April 29, 1956
home / Euro. Gero International Cup
1897
No. 7
Yugoslavia
2-2
Sept. 16, 1956
away / Euro. Gero International Cup
1907
No. 5
Yugoslavia
3-1
Oct. 7, 1956
away / friendly
1793
No. 11
France
2-1
Oct. 14, 1956
away / friendly
1866
No. 7
Austria
2-0
Versus World's Elite National Teams (Elo World Ranked Top #1 - #12):
19 wins, 4 draws, 0 loss
91.30% Winning Percentage
100.00% Undefeated Percentage

in equiv. top-tier American football, 19-0 (37.4 points/game)

Opp. Average
World
Ranking:

# 6.96

Goals/Match: +3.74Goals Ag/Match:-1.17


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Puskas Öcsi's team in top-tier American football terms recorded a remarkable 49-1 Olympian win-loss ledger in 6 1/2 years and outscored teams by +31.9 points/game. Against the world's elite ranked in the Top #12, the team went 19-0. In top-tier American football, a truly perfect world championship season is defined by winning 19 games consecutively.


*does not include the 1954 World Cup Final match due to various controversies

The Masters The World's Greatest of the GreatAnnual World MVP Player at each Position, 1947-1960

Year
Striker
Forward
Offensive Midfielder
/ Offensive Lateral
/ Defensive & Central Midfielder
/ Central Defender
/ Defender of the Year
1947
Rene Pontoni
Alfredo di Stefano
Valentino Mazzola
Stanley Matthews
Nestor Rossi
Neil Franklin
Neil Franklin
1948
Gunnar Nordahl
Ferenc Puskas
Valentino Mazzola
Felix Loustau
Danilo Alvim
Billy Wright
Branko Stankovic
1949
Ferenc Deak
Ferenc Puskas
Zizinho
Karl Aage Praest
Ernst Ocwirk
Neil Franklin
Branko Stankovic
1950
Ademir de Menezes
Ferenc Puskas
Zizinho
Alcides Ghiggia
Obdulio Varela
John Charles
Erik Nilsson
1951
Gunnar Nordahl
Alfredo di Stefano
Nils Liedholm
Tom Finney
Nestor Rossi
Cor Van Der Hart
Victor Andrade
1952
Sandor Kocsis
Ferenc Puskas
Juan Schiaffino
Estanislao Basora
Jozsef Boszik
Billy Wright
Billy Wright
1953
Nat Lofthouse
Ferenc Puskas
Raymond Kopa
Zoltan Czibor
Ernst Ocwirk
Robert Jonquet
Nilton Santos
1954
Sandor Kocsis
Nandor Hidegkuti
Fritz Walter
Zoltan Czibor
Jozsef Boszik
Jose Santamaria
Jose Santamaria
1955
Eduard Streltsov
Alfredo di Stefano
Raymond Kopa
Bernard Vukas
Igor Netto
Robert Jonquet
Robert Jonquet
1956
Nat Lofthouse
Alfredo di Stefano
Raymond Kopa
Julinho
Jozsef Boszik
Jose Santamaria
Nilton Santos
1957
John Charles
Alfredo di Stefano
Didi
Raymond Kopa
Duncan Edwards
Billy Wright
Billy Wright
1958
Just Fontaine
Pele
Didi
Garrincha
Danny Blanchflower
Billy Wright
Nilton Santos
1959
John Charles
Pele
Alfredo di Stefano
Francisco Gento
Dino Sani
Jose Santamaria
Djalma Santos
1960
Uwe Seeler
Ferenc Puskas
Luis Suarez
Garrincha
Danny Blanchflower
Jose Santamaria
Jose Santamaria
http://xtraimmortal.blogspot.com/2013/12/Annual-Best-Player.html



World Football's Highest Rated Matches of the 20th Century
Rank
Combined Points

Elo Rating
Nation 2
Elo Rating
Score
Date
Occasion
Venue Location
No. 1
4201
Hungary
2192
West Germany
2009

7.04.1954
1954 World Cup Final /
"Miracle of Bern"
Bern
2.
4162
Brazil
2088
West Germany
2074
1 : 0
6.16.1973
friendly
Berlin
No. 3
4149
Hungary
2169
Uruguay
1980
4 : 2
6.30.1954
1954 World Cup Semifinal /
"The Greatest Game Ever"
Lausanne
No. 4
4148
Hungary
2141
Brazil
2007
4 : 2
6.27.1954
1954 World Cup Quarterfinal /
"Battle of Bern"
Bern

4055
Hungary
2092
England
1963
7 : 1
5.23.1954
friendly / "Match of the Century II"
Budapest

4026
Hungary
2067
England
1959
6 : 3
11.25.1953
"Match of the Century" friendly
London



Hungary undefeated versusthe 5-Time World Champions, the Brazil NT in the 20th Century

Date
Occasion
Venue
Brazil NT Game Time Elo Rtg
Brazil Elo Ranking
Nation
Score
June 27, 1954
1954 World Cup Semifinal
Bern
2007
World No. 3
Brazil
4-2
July 15, 1966
1966 World Cup Group
Liverpool
2000
World No. 1
Brazil
3-1
July 21, 1971
friendly
Rio de Janeiro
2129
World No. 1
Brazil
0-0
March 16, 1986
friendly
Budapest
1879
World No. 6
Brazil
3-0


1949-1956 Hungary (10 years undefeated)

Aug. 20 1947 - Sept. 21 1957:With the Midas and Legendary Gyula Grosics
Gyula Grosics.jpg



Wins
Draws
Losses
Winning Percentage:
| Undefeated Percentage:
| Goals/Match -
Goals Against =
Goal Difference/Match
| Supercomputer's Ranking
43 matches*

in equiv. top-tier American football, 39-0 (40.5 points/game)
39
4
0
95.35%
100%
+4.05 gls/gm
-0.977 gl/gm
+3.07
Presumed Greatest Ever
inside 44 matches
*does not include the 1954 World Cup Final match due to various controversies


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Nike - the Goddess of Victory!




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Ferenc Puskas is recognized for being the greatest international goalscorer of the 20th century and the most prolific offensive player in top flight football in Europe. He captained the 'Magical Magyars' to sixty-three victories from 1945-1956 in a famous world career. Puskas earned eight offensive MVP (Most Valuable Player) goalscoring honors and partook in teams that entered the European Cup finale no fewer than six times and when he was not first, came in second, never third. Puskas also remains one of the most decorated footballing men in history having won national championships on eleven occasions.

The 'Bambino' and Ulysses of FootballFerenc Puskás: World Football's First Megastar
www.Puskas.com


It is might be prophetical and right that the 20th Century should have prepared the way for a player of prolific prizewinning Olympian productivity, and that when this player came, he was one of the extremely few who do not belong to any century but for all time.


Without knowing Puskas we can hardly view 20th Century football in perspective for Puskas is the master player who most completely indicates the ways and the times in which football turned from the traditions of much earlier times to the new mode of the second half of the century. How little the formative years sometimes tell about an individual's potentialities is exemplified by the fact that Puskas, who was known as ' Öcsi ' (Little Kid Brother, pronounced: ' Uhchee ') in his youth were he mastered the game with a liberated intelligence and talent in the simplest of settings during the inter-war years would lead a life of creativeness and wit, be involved in three of the most stupendous matches of the century from start to finish soaked in the atmosphere of the sensational that caused him to be ranked among the most celebrated players of all time and become a great football figure of the classic past. Three of his games where he was the chief participant, the 6-3 win over England where he scored two goals and made two more, the 1954 World Cup Final match (the world championship decider where he opened and closed the scoring notes with two goals, his equalizer being the most marvel of all) that lived under a cloud of suspicion, and the 7-3 win over Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 where he scored four goals are among the best ever done.


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The All-Time European 'Dream Team' Select XI.

Only he holds the proud distinction of being on three of the most hailed and renowned football teams of all time: mighty Honved (1943-1956), Hungary (1945-1956) and Real Madrid (1958-1967), the latter two have remained, for many, the principal national and club teams of the century.


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Ferenc Puskas with five sterling silver European Cup trophies, the world's most prestigious prize in club football.

Puskas is large both in the theme of his world football classics that are among the most colorful parts of the mid-century and in the volume of his output and succeeded in catching the flavor of a time and place in European history whose like we shall never see again. We are probably closer to the essential character of the proud high noon of the post-bellum age with Puskas than with anybody else that played the game and he must be considered one of the great originals among footballers and perhaps the best—Puskas, immortal on all rosters, the animator of forces of style that would serve as a model for many generations.


The remarkable career of Puskas, whose grace on the field tingled with football royalty with that utterly charming left foot shuffling the fates of men, teams and nations, baffling goalkeepers of whatever class, stretched across the whole modern post-war period and showed how a truly great player can reflect the varying developments of his age yet maintain an unmistakable individual sovereignty, unique and inimitable. His games were massive, elemental, becoming wonder games of the age demanding depth and insight. Puskas also remains incomparable also since his scoring streaks set him apart from all others, and found in him all the livable lessons of life and football.


A hundred anecdotes, largely legendary, celebrated the great footballer and authentic folk hero. As a player who was never bought or sold in his life, Puskás spent his entire career at the very top flight of his profession that seemed to raise his game to a sublime level.

All-Time Most Prolific Goalscorers in History in all Official Matches (updated July 29, 2017):

World Rank
Star Player
Country of Birth
Official Goals
Goal Ratio
Years Active
1.
Josef Bican
Austria-Hungary
805
1.52
1931-1956
2.
Romario
Brazil
772
0.78
1985-2007
3.
Pele
Brazil
767
0.92
1957-1977
No. 4
Ferenc Puskas
Hungary
746
0.99
1943-1966
5.
Gerd Muller
Germany
735
0.93
1962-1981
6.
Cristiano Rolando
Portugal
622
0.69
2001-present
7.
Lionel Messi
Argetina
592
0.78
2003-present
8.
Ferenc Deak
Hungary
576
0.77
1940-1957
18.
Fritz Walter
Germany
539

1937-1959
19.
Jozsef Takacs II
Austria-Hungary
523

1917-1934
tied 20.
Gyula Zsengeller
Austria-Hungary
522

1935-1953
tied 20.
Zico
Brazil
522

1971-1994
22.
Alfredo di Stefano
Argentina
514

1945-1966
29.
Sandor Kocsis
Hungary
493

1945-1965
30.
Imre Schlosser
Austria-Hungary
489

1905-1928
source: List of Players with + 500 goals

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All-Time Top Scorers in the 1st Division Domestic League (update 2014)
World Rank
Star Player
Domestic League
Goals
/ Goal Ratio
1.
Pele
Brazil
541
0.96
2.
Josef Bican
Austria / Czechoslovakia
518
1.52
No. 3
Ferenc Puskas
Hungary / Spain
517
0.96
4
Romario
Brazil / Holland / Spain / Australia
489
0.80
5.
Carlos Roberto de Oliveira
Brazil Spain
470
0.62
6.
Imre Schlosser
Hungary / Austria
417
1.31
7.
Gyula Zsengeller
Hungary / Italy / Columbia
416
1.06

source: http://xtrahistory.blogspot.com/2014/04/Record-Statistics.html


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Puskas and Real Madrid great and good friend, the winger Gento in a bullfighter arena try out the national sport of Spain from inside the ring.

It has been well said that Puskas, the man, the footballer, the legend, and his life and times considered together were in many respects unprecedented. Ferenc Puskás often enters the conversation of where the greatest footballers ought to be lodged in the pantheon of the last hundred years. The roll-call of the greatest would include men who have shaped football's affairs as well as imprinting their potent influence on national and club-level football productions and be outstanding among players beyond the prowess of the average soccer layman. Not many players have had the versatility, prolificness, and knack for the spark which notifies championship outcomes, all of which belong to Ferenc Puskas.


If debate for being the greatest player of the 20th Century is plainly laid to figures for most goals at the highest levels both in the club and the international game, not to be estimated in any way by other criteria, it would assign this great amasser of goals an honored place in the game’s hallowed iconography. The ever folksy and personable Ferenc Puskás was the most significant striker Europe ever saw at first division football—certified to have scored a world record first-division 616 goals. He was also the greatest goalscoring international of the century who ever lived, scoring 83 goals in 83 matches, taking his "official" first-division and international scoring total to exactly 699 goals, the sheer breadth of his output showed just how immense and indeed Olympian a footballer's scope legitimately can be. High in the towering pantheon of prolific scoring numbers, records and precedence is Ferenc Puskas.


Undoubtedly, the most renowned and greatest of Hungarian sportsmen, he is in company with magician Harry Houdini, Hollywood legend Bela Lugosi, newspaper magnate Joseph Pulitzer, Sir Alexander Korda (father of the British film industry), William Fox (founder of 20th Century Fox), Albert Szent-Györgyi (discoverer of Vitamin-C), Andy Grove (co-founder and CEO of Intel Corporation), polymath John von Neumann (the father of the modern computer), composer Bela Bartok, Alexandre Lamfalussy (the patron father of the 'euro'), photographer Robert Capa, chess wizard and grandmaster Judit Polgar, and Ernő Rubik who lent his name to the iconic Rubik's Cube for being among the famous Hungarian citizens of the 20th Century.

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A exhibit to an exceptional player, Ferenc Puskas, at the National Football Museum, Manchester, United Kingdom, 2015.

During a busy decade of a difficult rebuilding world in the post-bellum era, in the arc light and formative glow of nascent mass media with a global reach and increasingly networked newswires at the dawn of live television that meet audiences as never before made possible a new kind of connectedness and a new kind of culture which we call mass or popular culture. Around this time Puskás became football's first superstar both at club level and in the world game who foreruns the likes of Alfredo di Stéfano, Pelé, Johan Cruijff, Diego Maradona, Zinedine Zidane, David Beckham and it was Puskas who first spoke to and for this new era as football was being reinvented and telecommunications effectively shrank the global community.

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Football's first superstar, the talismanic Ferenc Puskás in 1955 with his daughter Aniko - the prime initiator and captain of the Hungarians, nicknamed 'The Galloping Major" and the Spanish "Pancho" was the world's top scorer internationally (83 goals in 83 games) who scored a combined 616 goals in tier one football which still is the all-time high in Europe. Winning Olympic gold in 1952 and the pan-European championship in 1953 in Rome, his scoring streaks ushered in the highest rated international football team of the 20th century, the 'Magical Magyars'.


Like the first greatest and all-time American baseball's greatest player Babe Ruth (the 'Bambino' who scored a world record 714 homeruns), Ferenc Puskas was rotund with a round paunch and with muscular billiard ball table legs with deceptive acceleration capable of real pace. Puskás never did acclimate to using his non dominant right foot for much except to dribble and scored few goals with his head. But he more than made up with an on-field generalship and a deep cerebral reading of the game as a highly competitive genius of daring color. He had a keen footballing brain to match his otherworldly accuracy. He had intuition with extra sensory awareness to grasp other sides' nuances with novel thinking and an encompassing eye in less than fifteen minutes of play by issuing a stream instructions to orient his team, often yelling at players many years his senior as a 'playing coach’ solving ever-changing game vistas on the run. Mentally striding in to take the lead, Puskas became an expert in the management of matches and in the manipulation of men playing the game that revealed his calling as a versifier of genius and the darling golden boy of the system. Many thought that no one had a keener relish for the texture of the game than Puskas, whose agile intellect grasped knowledge hungrily and who came with a precocious talent at an early age making the national team all of eighteen as a supreme possessor with a heroic scoring indulgence on the ball that succeeded in catching the eye of Europe.


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A magnificent derby between the two powerhouses of MTK and Honved played in the Nation's Stadium in 1954. In the foreground is Ferenc Puskas with Honved, second from left is Nandor Hidegkuti.

Much of what Puskas would come to stand for was determined long before his playing days at Real Madrid; before the great age of the 1950s and 1960s properly declared itself, Puskas, armed with his rhapsodic vision in the 1947-1948 season at Honved, scored 50 goals in 32 games to lead all players in the world at first-division, and set the current of opinion that Puskas by then had qualified as one of the elites in the game. His well-known journey at Kispest-Honved saw Puskas score 352 goals out of his 341 games that effected an immense enlargement for the club's international prestige and elaborated a climax of Honved as the finest club side in the world, and a already a initial career like this would have culminated with a first entry into Europe's pantheon of all-time greats. Confronted with the question of how he came by way of these instruments and knowledge, one can only conclude it was by sheer genius.



His very great value lay in his ability to touch a game as a clever deviser with pulsing creative energy and with exquisite and accurate poise with his left foot reputed to be the most powerful in football history. In radical possession of an extremely rare asset, equipped with the most strong drive ever cast from a left foot — an inherent cannonball that deftly tore through defenses with stunning accuracy. So filled are the annals of games with Puskas able to conclude things very fast with his rippling single footedness that, in the least, a towering 746 total goals ( http://www.rsssf.com/players/prolific.html ) were submitted upon goaltenders of various origins during his 23-year career with an unidextrous feel that prized out the tightest defenses. Most surprising for a player who almost entirely lacked an audience with this right foot, but whose assured urbanity and energetically inquisitive intelligence during the game's commotion that never halted at a fixed position but reflected ceaseless exploration coupled with a superb effortless command of his left foot put away all doubt that, as a player, Puskas was found worthy of being in the top three players who ever played the game (Pele and di Stefano being the others). Football history's second player to surmount 600 official career goals, a benchmark for very elite status, was achieved by Puskas Öcsi, and he is one of only five players in history to surpass 700 official goals.


A great deal of their success located Puskás to be the center of most things involving the team as a sharp operator both on the field and off with a fine grasp of public relations inside one of the most repressive regimes in Europe. The indisputably star player was the uplifter of an already great Hungarian side who drove his teams with a demanding love for winning to heights unrivaled; and set a pace and a course to elicit the energy of Hungary's worthies and raise their minds to brave thinking that gave spur to his country's football flowering. The fact is that with Puskás at the helm Hungary became the most powerful footballing force in the world that lost a single game in six years. Here was a team that legend could sing of as a paragon of vitality bringing infectious happiness directed by a wily uomo universale of renaissance dreams who touched genius at every point. This football symphony-maker, this conspicuous student of the game, this teacher of athletes, this organizer of huge teams eternally floating solutions played far off into the match and confronted it with swing and improvisation with the eyes of the artist so that power streamed out of him.


Puskás was honored for being named the top 1st division goalscorer in the 20th century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS) in 1995. The IFFHS ranked Puskás after Pelé as the second greatest offensive player as an advanced forward of the 20th Century.


Top International Goalscorers of the 20th Century:

World Rank

Player

Nation

Goals

| Appearances

Goal Ratio

Hat tricks

Years Active

No. 1

Ferenc Puskás

Hungary

83

83

1.00

5

1945-1956

2.
Godfrey Chitalu
Zambia
79
111
0.71
6
1968-1980
3.
Hussain Saeed Mohammed
Iraq
78
137
0.57
5
1976-1990
4.
Pelé
Brazil
77
92
0.84
7
1957-1971
tied No. 5
Sándor Kocsis
Hungary
75
66
1.136 (world record past 52 goals)
7 (previous world record)
1948-1956
tied No. 5
Kunishige Kamamoto
Japan
75
76
0.99
8 (tied world record)
1964-1977
tied No. 7
Majed Abdullah
Saudi Arabia
71
116
0.61
4
1978-1994
tied No. 7
Kinna Phiri
Malawi
71
115
0.62
4
1973-1981
9.
Piyapong Pue-on
Thailand
70
100
0.70
4
1981-1997
10.
Gerd Müller
West Germany
68
62
1.097
8 (tied world record)
1966-1974
11.
Ahmed Radhi
Iraq
62
121
0.51
3
1982-1997
No. 12
Imre Schlosser
Hungary
59
68
0.87
5
1906-1926

The games against the 'Soviet Union' on May 24th and 27th 1952 was played against a ' Moscow Select XI ' (Moscow city clubs' selection and therefore not the 'national team') therefore it is not an official "full international match" between national teams and will not be included in the statistics. Moreover, the referee in the match was from the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union would be officially recognized and sanctioned by FIFA in 1954.

Puskás exchanging pennants in the "Match of the Century", London England 1953 where the Magical Magyars won 6-3.  "The Match of the Century" was international football's greatest and most influential prestige friendly ever played that was also named the 'World Championship Decider' by the British press.
Puskás exchanging pennants in the "Match of the Century", London England 1953 where the Magical Magyars won 6-3. "The Match of the Century" was international football's greatest and most influential prestige friendly ever played that was also named the 'World Championship Decider' by the British press.


Very few players had careers or stories to tell quite like Ferenc Puskás for a number of occasions. In all that reporting of his career, a common thread in playing days that made him unique: simply that there is an air of the precious about almost all that he did, a glinting Midas touch, everything he touched on the field turned to gold in his lifework. He only played on three teams: Budapest Honvéd, Hungary, and Real Madrid, three teams that were to take turns in dominating his life amid their greatest flowering in golden periods of their own; every side to which he was attached were eminently the best in the world, and whether at Honved, Hungary or Real all prospered strikingly who played alongside him. They profited from an elegant yet fiery competitor with outgoing rough-diamond manners whose career crackled with re-inventive life and who beautified small and large spaces with luscious jewels of work around the goal-line by extending himself into everything he created.



Perchance the strange, narrow, rigid socialist world in which he lived was constructed to provoke the rebelliousness latent in Puskas' spirit. Later estranged from his homeland due to the reprisals that were the fallout of the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution and what might have awaited him for his refusal to return from abroad, and unconnected with interests in politics as Puskás was, he took that step that constitutes a temptation to many, defecting from Hungary which owes its origin to his desire to escape the storm that followed back home. Interspersed with problems of adjustment which faced him in language and customs, Puskas was adrift and languishing in exile his career and fortune apparently behind him. On the wrong side of thirty and serving a one-year ban from FIFA, the famous epicurean was now mostly thought out of shape and in the twilight of his playing days. He has the capacity for change and sought to understand his new environment which molds the local mind and soon rose out of limbo and found himself in the employ of the greatest club and one the richest sports institutions in the world, Real Madrid at the height of its powers to begin a second consecutive and stunning double career.


By far, the best c
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With Hollywood star good looks, Ferenc Puskas greets Fritz Walter of West Germany during World Cup group play with the Magical Magyars winning 8-3
onsidered players among the supreme ever to play in Europe last century was Puskás, Alfredo di Stéfano and Johan Cruijff. From the other far side of Europe would come Puskás to meet di Stéfano on the same side in a storied centering of two iconic careers to begin another adventure in his second-act; and a stander on high, Puskas led something far away from an average and mediocre footballing life, and the best of the two winning-est, important, and quintessential teams in history cannot be told anyhow without Öcsi Puskas. They were dynamic men, debonair, wholly excellent and admirable.


Real Madrid's "decade of dominance" from 1956-1967 of which Puskas was a major part is considered by historians to be the greatest era for any first-division team that saw them enter eight European Cup championship title games, winning six major trophies; and amid some of the fulfillments of the greatest 1st division offensive line (Puskas-di Stefano-Gento-Kopa-Rial) ever concerted and a bold defense contending with a fiery vehemence to excel made them the most famous team in the world.



Like the Magical Magyars, in 1958, Puskas found himself on a perfectly lauded, superbly destined, rightly charged sport-shaping team in Real Madrid, a full-dazzling side victoriously careering through the Spanish league and the newly-minted European Cup for the solid prizes of the game, winners of the first three European Cup titles, a new team dominating previous ones singing the strong works amid vistas of glory just as positive and real and not an iota less than the Golden Team of the 1950s.


The team that Puskas joined (1958-1967) were to splendidly press forward with glad scoring notes, pacing miles and miles each game with undeniable skill, health and power to five European Cup ('Champions League') Finale matches and six national championships; and fuller, O vastly fuller with the joy of the increase of the solid roll of prolific and vital Puskas, the team, receivers of new stamina, initiates the stuff that start an endless announcements of wins and be put on a perfect equality or better than any other nonpareil side in history.


The candid and unloosed Puskas offered his style to everyone and helps tell them their destination. By 1967 at the time of Puskas' retirement, this Real Madrid team seemed to rebuff the attacks of all the remainder of the footballing world with the conquered fame of heroes advancing on real ground toward the measureless ocean of greatness that took the ostensible applause and exaltation of the world for men have found nothing mightier than they were. With the strength and flush of Puskas and with many a pointed player of talent safeguarding the enchantment, the team, diviner still, pierces through the stock of previous great sides and becomes an awakened enterprise. Soon the prizes they sought are won. Their fame reverberates through the grandest scenery of the football world. They poured forth the sport's new meanings that all men knew to be true, they were "The Team of the Century".



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Puskas, named the 'European Player of the 20th Century' by L'Equipe, on a scintillating Real Madrid side with five European Cup ("Champions League") trophies and a 1st-division 'world championship' in 1960 on the "Team of the Century".

Duly the five appear in public in the proud and passionate city on a team that has no conceivable failures, that loss cannot touch at home and proceed the eleven resistlessly around their well-beaten Spanish and European rivals for six years; completer, dauntless, flowing, masterful, ample, unsurpassed, forever forward, forever alive, a new race of footballing men, peals of goals dart out of them like dreams' projections. They are ultimate in their own right, well-possessed of themselves, the ball falling in where it is wanted, playing a swift sport through the air or undergoing stratagems of movement and bursting through in un-looked for directions, the colloquy is there, the trio, the ball conversing with the learned men of the game far fitter than words can describe, they pass, score and are gone, teams cut by gaps of convoys and volleys, the east and the west of the pitch theirs, journeyers in uniforms of pure white over eight consecutive seasons undefeated!


Audiences throb to the brains and beauty of them thrilling works on the pitch as if no danger shall balk the practiced and perfect team sailing buoyantly over the roofs of the footballing world and its records. A vast camaraderie interlocks all.



Imbued as they are with this genius, aplomb in the midst of it all is Puskas at inside-left as a athletic footballing bard and Real Madrid joyfully meets a new translation. A strong scoring flare plays ever through them for they have found nothing mightier than Puskas who shall finally make the team completely victorious at home until the spring of 1965, and in next steps precipitate them to five European Cup finales and a "world championship" in 1960. The absorption into the team of Puskas, if it might be by the soil of his superior lambent shoots, the team sparkles hot and have positively appeared to great ripeness and conclusion foiling others with a long stretch of losses at the Bernabéu Stadium. Strong upon him is the life that is always in sight of the perfect team; to roll the thunder from his vigorous left-foot, to see that power is folded in wondrous interplay, to quell Europe and the world with another exceptional team, a great team waited for by old worlds and new amid a showered halo of acclaim was the folkloric legend of Puskas 'Öcsi '.


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Madrid, Spain in the early 1960s.


At a time when players think of retirement, Puskás faced a daunting challenge of learning a new language and culture in the distinct new world of Francisco Franco's Spain at variance with the communist world from where he was coming. But with the gift of confidence and the right mental attitude, Puskás soon endeared himself to everyone around him. Most importantly, he gelled with on-field boss and great Argentine star Alfredo Di Stéfano, who was never the easiest man to know and who could be distancing to those he failed to get on with. The driver at Real Madrid when Puskas arrived was di Stefano, then the regular captain of the team who was a man enthroned and who could really make the team perform. With temperamental cheek being part of the charm, Alfredo di Stéfano, a man of withdrawals and ego too, was the most determined and best footballer in Europe this side of Puskás who dominated life at Read Madrid that won the European Cup the first five times after the competition opened. Soon Puskás reached the right physical condition and again became a sunshot revelation, with that peerless left foot soon scoring a greater number of goals than di Stéfano himself to earn a high and prominent place in a talented constellation of Galácticos. A particular image of the player went with such dollop of panache, and Puskas’ nicknames in Hungary of 'Galloping Major', 'Little Kid Brother' now affectionately were termed into the Spanish 'Pancho', and was also given the impressive name of the 'Little Booming Cannon' as he assumed a position of foremost rank among the great players in the advanced and sophisticated game that Real Madrid practiced.



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Stars meeting stars, Ferenc Puskas and Hollywood star Rita Hayworth.

Club football scarcely attained such status of dominance than that of Real Madrid during the late 1950s and 1960s when Puskas played for them. The years in Madrid exposed a Puskas increasingly chiseled to meet the physical demands on an world renowned side in a second blooming of success in middle life who is working his way to the fore in a modern commercially oriented age. Winning six Spanish championships along with way, Puskás became a four-time Pichichi Trophy (top league goalscorer) incandescent forward in communion with di Stéfano to form the basis for the greatest double act world club football has ever seen and became illustrious among the players at Real Madrid. Many came to understand that the major goalscoring star in that constellation of talent was Puskas.


But at first, Puskas, who earned a life of the most perfect satisfaction at Honved and Hungary as captain could not feel so fully in harmony with his new enterprise. Having carried Honved and Hungary to heights never reached before, would his career be convertible towards far loftier activities abroad? His joyous appetite which he has very well developed commonly fetches him; and early frustration with his weight in his first season, Puskas eventually loses the pounds and started scoring richly so that by the final game of the season against Granada he was on even terms with di Stéfano for goals with both men neck-and-neck atop the league scorers' table. In his unique situation and realizing he needed to earn the friendship of the great Argentine star, in one scene during the match against Granada, Puskas, who neglected little opportunity to knock it in himself when the net was open to him, took the occasion to lay the ball off to di Stefano to score as a thing worth doing to foster happy concord with the brilliant headstrong player many considered the best in the world. This well-rounded gesture and great personal deed where Puskas' regard for di Stefano outran his own competitive nature made di Stefano that year's top goalscorer. Puskas was every hour a gentlemen, sharing his ethereal rays on the field and off of it. To love the public, to be a master of a nobler mind with a life-affirming, humorous sparkle was Puskas, who enjoyed exercising a substantial hospitality. The seeds of the honorable life had been successfully implanted in him. The great Real Madrid team began to recognize that they were meeting the real Puskas for the first time.


All-Time Greatest 1st Division Home-field Advantages
World Rank
Team
Games Undefeated Streak
Date Began
Streak End Date
No. 1
Real Madrid
121 matches
Feb. 17, 1957
Mar. 7, 1965
2.
Crvena Zvezda
96
Aug. 29, 1998
Aug. 7, 2004
3.
PVS Eindhoven
93
Sep. 17, 1983
Mar. 19, 1989
4.
FC Nates
92
May 15, 1976
Apr. 7, 1981

5.
Cobreloa
91
1979
1985

6.
Spartak Trnava
89
Mar. 30, 1968
April 2, 1974

7.
Torino
88
Jan. 31, 1943
Nov. 6, 1949
8.
Chelsea
86
Mar. 20, 2004
Nov. 26, 2008
No. 9
Panathinaikos
85 matches
April 8, 1973
April 16, 1978
Ferenc Puskas was head managerof Panathinaikos (Greece) from 1970 to1974.
http://rsssf.com/miscellaneous/unbeaten.html#home


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Three legendary and dazzlingly learned master craftsmen of the game on the "Team of the Century": unquestionably the most talented and greatest club strike trio of all-time: di Stefano-Gento-Puskas (1958-1964-66). Football history's greatest, the most decorated forward line with 14 won European Cup titles between them, the three would combine for a 437 goals together in just six years. At Real Madrid, di Stefano would score 307 total goals out of 396 matches and Puskas would score 242 goals out of his total 262 matches.


By the dint of his insatiable delight and simple pleasure in the business of leading men by his hardworking probing and passion for ideas, this energetic master of cues made Puskas such a royal personality. If di Stéfano kindled the engine as the 'starter' to the Real Madrid engine and paved the way with his sumptuous zig-zagging moves through opposing lines, Puskas was the sizzling 'finisher' with the final responsibility of leveling the boom with his cannonball shotmaking after breaching the final line. Together with the rapidly moving and inexhaustible di Stefano, Puskas produced a giantized image of Real Madrid complete with fantastic examples of each on the pitch that made Real Madrid incontestably their own to retail an apparently endless series of victories at home. He and di Stefano formed the 'card school' in the clubhouse, making sense in and among themselves to clean up against the younger players on the team and transmitting the same type of reckoning charge on the field.


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The greatest 1st division football team in history, the "Team of the Century": 1955-1967 Real Madrid: Puskas (Öcsi)-Di Stefano (the 'Blond Arrow')-Gento-Santamaria-Rial-Kopa.

With two such public figures piloting events, both who met problems, dealt with solutions to set things right and doing the kinds of things that others could not, Read Madrid reached superb heights and came in for a insuperable pre-eminence over teams at the Bernabéu Stadium that defined the greatest home field advantage in the history of club football. From February 17th 1957 to March 7th 1965, Real Madrid amassed one-hundred twenty-one continuous games undefeated at home that transported Real Madrid into an utterly different kind of club. With the Puskas & di Stéfano tandem at Real Madrid like Puskas & Kocsis at Hungary, the team could pose legitimately as history’s finest and most successful club enterprise that made home audiences see successive scenes of these two great standard-bearers exuberantly pulling every team astray with as much gusto and zest as could be had on rich running days.


Puskás was considered the indispensable man of campaigns and helped bequeath to Real Madrid a bevy of European Cup title match appearances, five in all, three of which were won by Real Madrid, including one that begot the famous 7-3 rout of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960. Certainly in that most renowned, world franchise-making European Cup finale Puskas registers a sophisticated sense and maintained his magical power and old divine strength; and to record the second half of his life at Real Madrid is to record his re-acquisition of world-class status and his transformation into a public living legend.

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October 10, 1963, Puskas at Wembley Empire Stadium in another "Match of the Century", FIFA XI 'Dream Team' against Alf Ramsey's England team. The occasion was the 100th anniversary of the Football Association. To celebrate, the FA organised what became known at the time as ‘The Match of the Century’. FIFA's first ever XI included the legendary lineup of Puskas, di Stefano, Gento, Kopa, Eusebio, Denis Law, Djalma Santos, and Lev Yashin in goal with over 100,000 watching in attendance.




During the time he played for Honved and Real, few players have put such an indelible imprint on tournament events as Puskas had which will ever speak to his surpassing charms from the many inimitable beauties of his left-footed shots. A resounding trait associated with Puskas was being at his imaginable best in the biggest of games where his inescapable goalscoring élan and virtues stood confessed and he seldom seemed to have missed anything, scoring 42 goals in 47 matches in all first-division European tournament games and the quality of that work was always superior. Particularly in these extravagant top-echelon games Puskas had given out the most singular performances: amazingly scoring 35 goals in 39 European Cup tournament matches that Real Madrid entered and who scored 7 goals in two European Cup finales.



All-Time Leading Goalscorers in European Tournaments by Goal Ratio (includes all Continental tournament games for 1st-division teams, minimum 40 goals)
source: www.wikipedia.org
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UEFA_club_competition_records_and_statistics

Rank
Player
Goal Ratio
Goals
Matches

No. 1
Ferenc Puskas
.894
42
47
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferenc_Puskas
2.
Jupp Heynckes
.889
56
63
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jupp_Heynckes
3.
Gerd Muller
.870
71
62
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerd_Muller
4
Lionel Messi
.820
97
119
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lionel_Messi
5.
Eusebio
.760
57
75
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eusebio
7.
Alfredo di Stefano
.743
52
70
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfredo_di_Stefano
8.
Cristiano Ronaldo
.740
108
147
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cristiano_Ronaldo
9.
Ruud van Nistelrooy
.670
62
92
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruud_van_Nistelrooy
distefanokubalapuskas.jpg
Three legends: di Stefano, Kubala (the man who made 'Camp Nou' in Barcelona famous), Puskas.


So liked and popular was Puskas in Madrid that in his testimonial match that was usually accorded players of distinction at Real Madrid after their retirement from the club, nearly eighty thousand people attended Puskas' own at the Bernabéu Stadium on May 26th, 1969. Huge numbers of supporters turned out for the occasion on a Monday evening in one great, emotional night against Rapid Vienna as a poignant sendoff for a much fondly remembered legend after nine years as one of the greatest-ever players to wear the all-white strip that brought him a place in the hearts of Real Madrid fans. Conversely, three days later, the event taking place at the Bernabéu had been Europe's championship Cup Final between Ajax and Milan merely watched by 32,000 spectators which only speaks of the joyous and warm acclaim by which Puskas was held at Real Madrid.


Puskas.jpg
Puskas, the greatest goalscorer in history and naturally one of its famous greatest leaders in Spain with Real Madrid teamates Jose SantaMaria, recognized as one of the greatest centerbacks in history and Alfredo di Stefano, the greatest center-foward in history.
Powerhouse that he was, a most noble quality of magnanimity to strangers in need was there during, above and beyond his working active years in football parks where he was wholeheartedly supported all his life. After the 1956 Uprising there were pockets of Hungarian expatriates in every major city in the West. While traveling with Real Madrid and beyond, he became a veritable consulate for members of these communities, ready to lend his support financial or otherwise to those who were most in need that enlarged his character. Wherever people were interested in aid and alleviation, there Puskas went as pleasing charming intercessor that gives us the whole man. Puskas’ story illustrates a remarkable Horatio Alger tale of a self-made man and generous to a fault player rising to the pinnacle of the game from humble origins from those youth games in the late 1930s.


The eminent position of Puskás in the field of football is attested by the many successes that crowned his efforts, first becoming the 1947 Balkan Cup champion, then becoming Olympic champion in 1952, then a much finer accomplishment, the European champion in 1953, winner of the unofficial "World Championship Decider" in 1953 in London, World Cup finalist in 1954, in addition to being the top goal scorer in the 20th century at top-flight football in Europe and the century’s top goal scorer in the international game who is united to three ultra-prestigious European Champions Cup (1959, 1960, 1967) titles, 1 acclaimed Intercontinental world title (the 1960 inaugural title match), 11 national championship crowns (5 Hungarian Nemzeti Bajnokság & 6 Spanish Primera División) and 8 top individual Most Valuable Player (MVP) scoring honors. A whole generation will best remember Ferenc Puskas as a master player intimately associated with six prestigious European Cup Final matches. Others will recall him for his gaily illustrated goals and exploits with Honved and Hungary while teamed with Sandor Kocsis, who, both, unwittingly, were prophets of the European Cup that began in 1955 with a celebrated encounter (the 'unofficial' European championship final between Wolverhampton and Honved) in December at the Molineux in 1954.



Like a proud player who had helped lead the team so long, Puskas would retire just as the game was assuming a tone that was becoming more and more conservative and stifling. For the next quarter century of his life when Puskas was no longer producing on the pitch he was now contributing his time as a coach and as an elder statesman also that made his own earlier work live for younger generations. He chose a consecutive journey-work life in management and chose that medium for his last message because he felt obliged to tutor and bring mentoring light to youngsters with a grand coaching tour that took him to far away clubs on five continents as a citizen of the world, he of endless nationality. The 1970-1971 year bore witness to Puskas as a marvelous leader again that earned him a reputation for fine teaching. He memorably guided a modest, distant, unheralded and little known Greek club, Panathinaikos, with a very nice ordering of wins obtained over big tournament stalwarts to head into the 1971 ultra-prestigious European Cup Final itself that kindled the people of Greece into raptures, this in spite of being given not much of a chance by many and with the most lukewarm of outlooks.


real madrid 3 benefica 5 1962 amsterdam 4.29.jpg
Ferenc Puskas at the airport right before the European Cup Final versus Benfica in May of 1962. Puskas would go onto to 3 goals in the first half to take a 2-0 lead and a 3-2 advantage at half-time for Real Madrid.

FIFA President Sepp Blatter had seen Puskás play in the 1954 FIFA World Cup Final in Berne. As a eighteen year old Swiss journalist, Blatter was involved throughout the match as a supporting spectator of the Magyars. In homage to Puskás for what he represented on the field and for enduring personal virtues off of it, Blatter founded in 2009 an international recognition award, the FIFA Puskás Award, meant to ensure Puskás' memory would remain powerful as ever for future generations.



In a fulsome life of varied activities as a great player and restaurateur, Puskas later became one of more noted Hungarian managers serving abroad whose journey's took him to five continents in the service of successive patrons, and towards the end of his life became acclaimed consultant and ambassador to the sport until he retired to his native city of Budapest. The daily side of him is all common sense, his characteristic response and feeling to life was a oneness to dedication, resilience, a wayward spontaneity, humor and wit that gave as good as he got, and is one of the most living and appealing figures in recent memory because he expressed with the greatest glow the national dreams of personal freedom in the hearts of his countrymen whom people looked to for statements on football and life; who followed the promptings of his witty light-hearted sparkle to being the man that he was. Perhaps it was inevitable that the twentieth century should rouse a Ferenc Puskas — a citadel of virtue, outrageous cheek and expansive gusto. It was wholly appropriate, therefore, that the Nation's Stadium in Budapest finally bear his name in 2002 that does justice to a remarkable life superbly lived and acknowledged, here and elsewhere, finally, the greatest 1st division and international goalscorer of the century.

RealMadridPuskas.jpg

puskas_panathinaikos_autogramm_kartya00011.jpg
The head man of the Greek Shamrocks to prove another journey's gifts: Ferenc Puskas' gleaming season in management with Panathinaikos, a magical European Cup campaign in 1970-1971 that confounded the pundits. Under Puskas' laissez-faire approach and guidance, his Greek champion club routed Jeunesse Esch 7-1 on aggregate in the first round, then proceeded to defeat Slovan Bratislava 4-2 in the second. In the quarterfinal Puskas' side outlasted English champions Everton 1-1 on the away goal. In the semifinal, the very powerful Yugoslav Red Star Belgrade had his team pinned down 1-4 on goals in the first leg playing away. In a historic match that resonated sensationally in the whole of early 1970s Greece, Puskas' side reversed fortunes with a 4-1 thrilling late revival in their home stand that many could not believe. They faced Ajax in Wembley stadium on June 2, 1971 and gave their much heralded Ajax opponents a classic duel till the end losing only 0-2 (one of them an own-goal). Ajax began their run of winning three consecutive European Cup Finals in a row.


Rank
Player
Goals
European Cup/Champions League Finale Matches
Goal Ratio
No. 1
Ferenc Puskas
7
1960, 1962, 1964
2.33
Tied 1.
Alfredo di Stefano
7
1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1964
1.00


puskas(6).jpg
Some of the great souvenirs of a fabulous career: three ultra-prestigious sterling European Cup trophies won (1959, 1960, 1966) and a "World Championship" prize with Ferenc Puskas on the greatest club side in football history with Real Madrid.

puskasinspain.jpeg


Here is a great man tallied!—the glory of a player like Puskas, in him the start of superior journeys, populous victories, world renown, a footballing bard to give the traits of new footballing ages outlining a history yet to be, a knower of the game, traveler of actions, rapt years and absorbing eras in the fairest weather, held some so much greatness that he is considered long to be the greatest European player of the century. But lovers of Puskas' productivity and prolificness have hailed him as the supreme footballer of all time.


To have a famous footballing life on the pitch and beyond as a head manager on teams charged with untellable living wisdom, in him the drift of all things golden, giving all the drench of passions for audiences to drink the mystic deliria on many a championship teams entirely redeemed him, the Ulysses of football.


PuskasPrizeInauguration.jpg
Erzsebet Hunyadvari, Ferenc Puskas' dedicated loving soulmate and wife and FIFA President Sepp Blatter establish the FIFA Ferenc Puskas Prize in 2012.








20070607kocsis.jpg
The Cavalier from El Dorado, goalscoring extraordinaire Sándor Kocsis (nicknamed 'The Cube' or 'Golden Head'), was arguably the world's purest goalscorer in the international game - being the 3rd most prolific striker of the century (75 goals in 66 appearances), who carried his team over many good sides in his 66 game international career. He was the star catalyst of the great Ferencvaros side of 1949 that won the national title that year. In 1952, 1954, and 1955, Kocsis was again Hungarian national champion with Honved-Kispest. In 1959, 1960 was Spanish national champion with Barcelona FC, and won the Spanish Copa del Rey in 1959 and 1963. Kocsis' Barcelona side won the Inter-Cities Fair Cup in 1960. In the 1961 European Cup Final against Benefica, Sandor Kocsis and Zoltan Czibor both scored in the heartbreaking 2-3 loss in the Wankdorf stadium in Berne.

'The Natural'Sandor Kocsis:The 'True Ace' International


kocsis sandor in white shoes.jpg



Sandor Kocsis was the nearest thing to the 'natural striker' for whom formalists had been searching for ever since the early twentieth century who built a reputation as a world leading scorer of a particular kind, and became a master worthy, too, to stand beside his greatest contemporaries with the other recognized gods of the game.


Only one other talent of his day can be compared with Puskas and Pele in the world game, that of Sandor Kocsis, and no one of his time had so lively a footballing artistry as Kocsis. The rapidity and sureness of Kocsis' development has had no match whose career was made up of brilliant sections of football, and like his achievements were unique in history. Sandor Kocsis was for his own time a player of entire quality and unparalleled efficiency who has had few peers.


Sandor Kocsis remains one of football's giant figures most important first of all because he was a great player and because he, along with Puskas, announced and instructed a new age at the historical moment for the rise of new tactics and football's re-invention. Like Puskas, he would lead a double career, and the pattern of the life of Kocsis for many years was the pattern of Puskas' own. Kocsis showed simply a luminous gift for scoring as did Puskas, but Kocsis played more successfully than anyone has ever seen. So potent, in fact, was Kocsis at his best that the twentieth century is prone to regard Sandor Kocsis as the most victory-anointed international player of the last hundred years for adventuresome scorers who upcast their teams with at least 35 goals.

Most International Goals All Time in a Single Year
Rank
Player
Nation |
Goals
| Year

No. 1

Sandor Kocsis
Hungary
23
1954
No. 2
Ali Daei
Iran
22
1996
tie 3
Sven Rydell
Sweden
19
1924
tie 3
Romario
Brazil
19
1997
No. 5
Just Fontaine
France
18
1958
No. 6
Imre Schlosser
Hungary
16
1912
tie 7.
Gunnar Nordahl
Sweden
15
1947
tie 7.
Ronaldo
Brazil
15
1997

Sandor Kocsis was born in September 1929, and growing up in young manhood during the war lived through a time of extraordinary trouble and turmoil. During Allied bombing raids of the capital city where large areas of the city was turned into debris, Kocsis' family retreated to house cellars and there he practiced kicking a tightly-wound rag ball at walls and objects. Nor was Kocsis' family well-to-do like Puskas' during those days with a great many people in financial plight during a period of shortages and rationing during this period. As soon as the intense street-to-street fighting had stopped with the Russians occupying the capital in the spring of 1945, his father thought perhaps football held good promise in his future and introduced him to Ferencvaros' junior team that was a good distance from their residence and was Hungary's first young man to register after the war. Football the adventure propelled by the strenuous life was the strong life for him, and his father desired that kind of life for him.


Despite such comparatively unpromising beginnings, Kocsis worked hard and learned much and became a full starter for the senior team of Ferencvaros aged but sixteen, debuting against a Kispest squad that featured Puskas in the lineup. Right from the start, Kocsis appeared different from the others, a demure and shy young man who took his solid pleasures on the soccer field or in another game he enjoyed greatly: chess. He was described by many as tall, fast, svelte and sculpturesque but lacking ballast in weight, and the club arranged to build up his physical blessings and constitution with a caloric diet delivered to his home, while his father given a local pub to manage to help relieve some of the financial hardships.

ferencvaros.jpg
Team portrait of the great 1948-49 Ferencvaros side (+3.5 goal differential per match) that won the league before a dominating reign of Honved and MTK beginning in the 1950s. Ferencvaros is the most supported athletic and sports institution in Hungary and has won the domestic title on 28 occasions. Playing alongside Laszlo Budai, Zoltan Czibor, Sandor Kocsis was also paired with Ferenc Deak who scored a world record 66 goals in one single season in 1945-1946.


Kocsis played at Ferencvaros (a local Budapest district) then and still the most supported and popular club in the land with its nationalistic and patriotic associations before and after the war. In 1948-1949 with Kocsis leading and scoring 33 goals out of 30 matches, Ferencvaros came first in the league on a superb team that logged a goal differential of +3.5 goals each game. The following next year he scored 30 goals out of 30 matches as his team came in second-place behind Puskas' Honved. The report of such a prodigy awakened interest in many representatives who were watching for talent all over the country to assemble for the national team that Kocsis should play for Honved. He was then given the prospect when he came of conscription age of either serving in soldiery on a frontier border-post or playing for them thereby excluding Kocsis from this military obligation.


Those two bonding earlier years at Ferencvaros gave Kocsis a indelible love for the club that never quite left him knowing his heart was one that belonged there and most everybody privately knew it, and Kocsis seemed most himself when lost in the milieu at Ferencvaros. Whenever he arrived at a local restaurant bandmasters would stop their original tune and strike up a favorite Ferencvaros song; and another fever burned in him, the hunger for greatness and fame and the ambition to be a Ferencvaros man always remained.


The inheritor of roughly half the supplied assists, Kocsis spent his next years in an ideal location at Honved for such influences to mold his life and his game and provoked Kocsis to adopt the critical weapons Puskas didn't have, a right footed shot and his head. There too Sandor Kocsis sustained and deepened his varied output and found his way into it frequently scoring 153 goals in 145 games and came second in time but first in importance behind that relentlessly productive master Puskas in league matches which tended to end in winning pleasure.


kocsis sandor7.jpg
The prodigal Apolloan goalscorer, Sándor Kocsis, a celebrant of the 1954 World Cup who averaged a record 2.2 goals-per-game.
As an authority in size and pace, Kocsis looked that part and observers noted the great degree that Kocsis was able to gain the upper hand in the air, an aerial prowess that would be one of his great towering, emblematical attributes. In the normal course of his career he had an admirable beginning, trudging a plain high road to renown with him being the world's leading first-division scorer in 1952 and 1954 with respect to 36 and 33 goals in those years that elevated him at the bar of history. He is most wonderful with his clear-blooded, strong-fibered physique who outvies others promiscuously while taking soaring flight in the air. Proper scores of tumbling gorgeousness cascade from his right foot and his head with prodigal zest. Most people presumed him the greatest header of the ball who ever lived. His raids among crowds so perfect, so essential that he could direct with superlative skill.


Quite a different side of Puskas, Kocsis could shoot terrifically and accurately with both feet and his head whereas Puskas was renowned for his booming broadsides with one. If Puskas was very lively in his perceptions and his spontaneous overflow and control, Kocsis was no less vigorous. Tall, handsome, strong, with no surplus once of flesh to burden him and a mind clear to see the point of a matter at once, one can detect in Sandor Kocsis superior elements in his game that is permanently on the alert, an athletic presence and a commanding persistence whose own manner of action had greatness in itself.



kocsis ferencvaros.jpg
On his way up, he made his debut for the national team in June of 1945 in a high-scoring 9-0 defeat of Romania where he scored two goals to begin an enormously successful career at inside-right until October of 1956, and the team came through more successfully than other countries in large measure because of his talents and strengths. The next nine years showed Kocsis at the height of his energies and left no doubt that a player of great talent, like Puskas, had appeared in the period succeeding the war.


By the year 1954 when he was already seasoned in his profession and set to the fantastic frame of the World Cup tournament, it appeared to explain Sandor Kocsis himself as a great player exceeding all others in the game's history for scoring an average of 2.20 goals per game in those important matches that won the attention of the world. The 1954 World Cup was converted by Kocsis' art into a quasi-mythic competition for the delight and memorability it afforded, and no small part is owed to Sandor Koscis for conveying Hungary's success. It is also a plume in Kocsis' records the year in which the World Cup was played that saw his far-reaching fame go furthest, which remained an image of exclusively Kocsis' domination of the game when he scored 24 goals, the still the most in a single year in world football outside Asian federations.


Imagine a long, lean, fantastic young man with fine dreams who was so very rich in talent and who was on his way to becoming the greatest goalscorer of all time in the world game, that was Sandor Kocsis, the most constant of players. He tended to produce magnificent hat tricks, seven in all which was then a world record for many years after he left the international stage not by his choice.

History's Highest Scoring Averages in the World Cup Tournament by Goal Ratio
(all-time, minimum 5 goals):

Rank
Player
Nation
Goals Ratio
Goals
Matches
Tournament Years
No. 1
Sandor Kocsis
Hungary
2.20
11
5
1954
2.
Just Fontaine
France
2.17
13
6
1958
tie 3.
Guillermo Stabil
Argentina
2.00
8
4
1930
tie 3.
Josef Hugi
Switzerland
2.00
6
3
1954
tie 3.
Oleg Salenko
Russia
2.00
6
3
1994
6.
Leonidas
Brazil
1.60
8
5
1934 / 1938
7.
Eusebio
Portugal
1.50
9
6
1966

In international games Kocsis receives enormous meaning and leaves us with many certainties. As the century drew to a close in December of 1999, the only other twentieth-century player to outrank Kocsis's 75 goals was the Brazilian Pelé merely by two goals in 24 additional games played. Kocsis' pervasive quality at point and aura was profound near the goal with a fantastic vein of speed, touch, and control and simply set forth with what he saw in the light of his athleticism to master a role that even outpaced that of his teammate Puskás in strike-rate, scoring 75 goals to his country's service in 66 internationals. This turned people's eyes pretty much towards Kocsis as the successor, and perhaps, the superior of Puskas; underlying the lustre and glories that were laid open for the team, this considerable talent hefted greatly for carrying the team to victories.


Versatile and various as he was, Kocsis' place in history also came from his positive influence becoming one of those rare individuals who conducted a clear-cut winning conviction into his matches and carried his team a very long way. For what shone in Kocsis was loading great triumphal sway into his matches, revealing into his forté some inextinguishable fire amid the brightest boasts of attacking football one may find and the scale would turn in his country's favor. Big, laudable football, one's calling, are everywhere in Kocsis. One met with triumph now more oftener with the untutored, natural, homing play instincts of Kocsis and shows an appropriately sophisticated player who frequently points out the essential path to climatic wonders of the football pitch and who was sure to come off conqueror: running through there in the games in which he scored, the Hungarian team came up with 37 wins, 4 draws and only 2 losses (95.35% undefeated percentage).


After the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, Sandor Kocsis arrived at a more specific course of a hopeful future than his strike partner Puskas. A spring and summer spent in Switzerland after the events of 1956, Kocsis went freely with powerful and educated persons of the game to Barcelona, then lead by one of the greats in the Spanish league, Laszlo Kubala, a Hungarian refugee himself. There Czibor joins him, and the three Hungarians would work there with equal glory.

Ramon Vazquez_Kubala_Czibor_Kocsis_Luis_Suares 1958.jpg
The great stars of 1958 Catalan Barcelona: Ramon Alberto Villaverde Vazquez, Laszlo Kubala, Laszlo Czibor, Sandor Kocsis and Luis Suarez Miramontes.


schlosser-imre_.jpg
Arguably the greatest footballer of the first half of the 20th century: Hungary's pre-war great Imre Schlosser - world record holder for most international goals (59) before Ferenc Puskás broke his countryman's record on Nov. 25, 1953 in the "Match of the Century" against England. Schlosser Imre was the world's top club goalscorer in 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, and scored 258 goals out of 155 matches at Ferencvaros and 141 goals in 125 matches at MTK Hungaria. He was also one of the most decorated players in history for being on thirteen national championship teams, seven with Ferencvaros and six with MTK Hungaria.




Top Goalscorers in any First-Division League in the World in a Single Season:


World Record Holder
| Year as World's # 1 Scorer
Goals
Club
I mre Schlosser
1911
42
Ferencvaros
Imre Schlosser
1912
40
Ferencvaros
Imre Schlosser
1913
42
Ferencvaros
Imre Schlosser
1914
36
Ferencvaros
Alfred Schaffer
1918
42
MTK Budapest
Alfred Schaffer
1919
41
MTK Budapest
Gyula Zsengeller
1939
56
Ujpest Budapest
Ferenc Deak
1946
66 ( Old World record)
Szentlorinci
Ferenc Deak
1947
48
Szentlorinci
Ferenc Puskas
1948
50
Honved
Ferenc Deak
1949
59
F erencvaros
Sandor Kocsis
1952
36
Honved
Sandor Kocsis
1954
33
Honved





The Fabulous Crackerjack Three:
Best Forward Line in International Football History: Puskas-Kocsis-Hidegkuti
The 20th Century's Winningest Players Who Scored At Least 35 goals:

Victorious Star Players
Country
Goals
Wins
Draws
Losses
Winning Percentage
Sandor Kocsis
Hungary
75
52
10
4
86.36%
Nandor Hidegkuti
Hungary
39
53
7
7
84.33%
Zico
Brazil
48
51
17
3
83.80%
Ferenc Puskas
Hungary
83
63
10
10
81.93%
Pele
Brazil
77
67
14
11
80.43%
Gerd Muller
West Germany
68
45
9
8
79.84%
Bebeto
Brazil
39
50
16
9
77.33%
source: http://rsssf.com/miscellaneous/century.html#goals
The games against the 'Soviet Union' on May 24th and 27th 1952 was played against a ' Moscow Select XI ' (Moscow city clubs' selection and not the 'national Soviet Union team') therefore it is not an official "full international" match between national teams and will not be included in the statistics. Moreover, the referee in the match was from the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union would be officially recognized and sanctioned by FIFA in 1954.

Puskas_Kocsis.jpg
Three icons of the game: Bela Guttman, Sandor Kocsis, Puskas. Legendary Hungarian manager Bela Guttmann is perhaps best remembered as a coach and manager of some the world's leading football teams, including Honved/Kispest, AC Milan, São Paulo, Porto, Benfica and C.A. Peñarol. His greatest success came with Benfica when he guided them to two successive European Champions Cup wins in 1961 and in 1962. He laid the fundamental tenets of the Hungarian 4-2-4 formation in Brazil starting in 1957, that led Brazil to World Cup triumphs in 1958 and 1970. He managed Ferenc Puskas at Kispest in 1948 and Eusebio in Benefica from 1959-1962.



The world will often afford examples of men, who, worthy of veneration and renown, have burst the shackles of mediocrity with a trailing cloud of glory to stand in the world a new order of men; men of the very right stuff promising transcendent moments cheerfully on the make to re-invent their own field of expertise about whom fantasies are conceived. How straight to the mark Puskas, Kocsis, Hidegkuti went in their thinking, with what radiance football's great forerunners of a new era had filled seven years!


They are the swift and majestic men, the grand natural players, Puskas, Kocsis, Hidgekuti baffling teams in strides, who had been the most prolific. Full of grace and fascination and very divine to some, their far-swooping lustily vivid mastery by healthy honest men is the programme of all good and is the token of manhood untainted. It is in the broad show of Puskas, Kocsis and Hidegkuti welding victories to victories with an unbeatable reign (49 months) stretching through longer time than any other without one jolt or the untruth of a single defeat that appeared by the 4th of July 1954 that no one could deny them their special destiny.


There is no team that has yielded more and greater patterns of goal-making than Puskas, Kocsis and Hidegkuti, the three pushed their goings earnestly at the head of a astonishingly free, sundry command of attack that was beyond question the greatest goal reckoning side in the history of international football: their combined scoring would be more numerous than those of any other trio past and future. This is the team which, above all others, had seized the affections of the footballing world in 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955 and 1956. They were great moments for Puskas, who offered an abundance of guidance to manage an awesomely prodigal line consisting of strength and powerful plays to clear broad scorelines: stepping out as strong global players with an unerring grasp of football that conquered from the late 1940s to the outbreak of the Hungarian Revolution in 1956.


The collectivist system did much to stamp Gustav Sebes' idea of his team being a design center for a harmonious band of supremely talented footballers. Up front, by braiding together two such devout talents in Puskás and Kocsis, his ultimate meritocrats, whose power lay in swaying the balance of the game in their favor, they became the greatest and redoubtable strike partners of them all whose landmark volume of 158 goals in the international record books put beyond question the position of Puskas and Kocsis as among the consummate craftsmen of the ages. Their momentous, joint and colossal order of 158 goals, a gulf between them and successive tandems gapes so hugely that unlike anything that went before or has come after it would prove everlasting. Theirs was a story of two invincible heroes drawn from the middle and lower classes in their prime who always seemed to tackle the big game, and plunged into it with stamina to mine the fantastic goal, the team maneuvered through two personal sagas and greatnesses, one emanating from Puskas and from Sandor Kocsis as each catches a competitive fire already kindled in the other.


The abundant days of Puskas and Kocsis during this period foretold future promise alternating between suggestions of specialness and unique dominance, and were internationally known as uncompromising players of the modern age on a team in which all function precisely as it should. There were few places better to visit than Budapest's Nepstadion (Nation's Stadium) where audiences readily responded to the greatest in things at the national team and compel us to enjoy the pleasure of being brought to such new football perspective where everything seemed true, gilding dull days with a hearty sense of earthly joys and exciting marvels. The national team, pushed forward by their example and aided by other accomplished players, was seen to move toward a enterprise of a powerfully imposing quality that lost one game over the course of six years and became an all-encompassing vault of vision and athletic mastery between these two vast acquirers of goals. The entire artistry of Kocsis and the ponderous broadsides and daring speculations of Puskas were inseparable from one another at Honved and at the national level, each with striking qualities of determination and skill, with both finding their identity and fame in the monuments of a very respected history.


These two men, Puskas and Kocsis, two Midas-type players, amid bright walks of rare imagination, are ever endeavoring to go beyond their predecessors, capable of putting forth unprecedented offense that sinks the great teams, firing mad enthusiasms in capacity crowds, they are making their way upward through football's hierarchy, they are treading in the steps to the sole fountain of football immortality where awe alone prevails. Great as Puskas and Kocsis are said to be, the national side was far better than it was often assumed because the team, like anything great and elaborate, had an extra content that added considerable starch to better seize every mode of play in advance of their competitors—a remarkable motion man who makes a lot of difference, Nandor Hidegkuti, who helped the team to fame.



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Intensively practiced and lighted from within by a common sociability as a team, here Nandor Hidegkuti produces a deft sleight of feet stop-ball maneuver that evades and gets by his marker on a practice field.



In particular at the national level, the greatest contribution of the Golden Team had been their campaigning of a prototype player that would lead the path to a tactical furthering— the playmaking deep-lying center-forward. In the midst of this highly versatile and amazingly powerful model, Sebes unveiled quietly a high value surreptitious centerpiece player that was of such sovereign use for great and far-reaching ends. Of a different mold but similarly influential, Sebes introduces a sharp-witted Nandor Hidegkuti as a deep-lying free trading player behind the inside pairing of Puskás and Kocsis. This something subtle and profound nuance of moving Hidegkuti off the main line put the game on a new course and later into football's lexicon entered the fluid station called ' playmaker ' — akin to a browsing, parsing and personally scoring player who directionalizes progressions down field resembling a quarterback in American football.


The unease that his created within opposing lines left them disjointed by drawing a natural tendency from defenses to leave him unmarked and operate freely in space un-buffeted by not being truly an advanced player. With event-driven spontaneity, Hidegkuti provided crashing sorties as ball movement dictated to crumble the center goal area and unlocked in the No. 9 position a new autonomous menacing robust character in football operating on the event horizon between midfield and the opposing rearguards and between creator and goalscorer. In Hidegkuti were equally blended the instincts of a roving spirit and disposition of a striker and an attacking midfielder who had many moments of being a rather remarkable player and has, with good reason, been called the ‘father of Total Football’.


Hidegkuti was a solid compelling figure, the type at his best. He wound in and out to put in his browsing expeditions to score goals and fulfilled many forays. Since he was an astute navigator he frequently could (with 39 goals in 69 appearances) and sent to the team a third au courant commander, able and famous. With this partnership of Puskás and Kocsis up front and a self-directing third arrow unpinioned in Hidegkuti the team had now become inestimably enhanced to cannily supply large rhythms of attack that sprang the deep bases of defenses in front of ever larger number of followers.


What wonderful productions of wit, equal verve and profusion of sportive sallies that makes approaches to footballing perfection was Puskas, Kocsis and Hidegkuti involved on? There was, perhaps, no team, however hardened by deep skill and long training, that was better. As players, they continued to meet the one decisive criterion for greatness, that is prevailing even against the most mountainous competition, battling the era's greatest combination talent to triumph: in big classic confrontations and clashes tremendous against the world's elite (World's Top #12-ranked) they managed to beat 19 teams, while drawing four times and lost but once. The rolling offense, a spectacular merger of the three men, that lambent sweet rhyme , that repertoire, seeing their designs with a good aroma of glorious verve lead the charge into "modern football" was such an accumulation of deeds that the footballing world marveled at their prodigious stream of works. Exploded scorelines were part of their real routine, and they won domination over half of their matches (32 out of 60 games from May 1950 to February 1956 ) by a three goal difference or more. Such is often the end of games that Puskas, Kocsis, and Hidegkuti played in, the Magical Magyars were sown thick with unquestionable proofs—the three players by October, 1956 stood at the head of their profession with 194 goals between them.




Jozsef Bozsik: the Conductor Par Excellance


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The legendary József Bozsik - Hungary's all-time international player with 101 appearances, the greatest center-half in the world who was the metronome from 1947 to 1962.


Through a longtime player of impactful tenure the team achieved a state of great flow. Plumb in the middle of the field there was a player who put attack and defense into communicable order for a workable unity and whose potent reputation traveled wide. Of all the prominent players between 1947 and 1962, the great wing-half Jozsef Bozsik was driven by the most sophisticated awareness that contrived the balance which had produced the seeds of majesty in the Puskas and Kocsis touch. József Bozsik's prime and lasting aim was always being the mediating intercessor and magnificent technician in the inner-workings of the Hungarian team who liked both to defend and attack, who upon occasion threw himself into scoring situations with feeling to bring about goals from deep. His eyes attuned to nuance as the innate navigator who crafted matches' thorough answers, Jozsef Bozsik's thoughtful and technical ball placement was unimpeachable from his earliest youth days when he played alongside Puskás at Honvéd since 1943. Jozsef Bozsik is the center through which unnumbered lines of connection pass because his real effort is one of throwing midfield into shape and order with inexhaustible energies.


From the tender age of five or six from the days when they were literal next door neighbors in an apartment flat (Puskas' family lived at 57 /A Columbus Street) that overlooked the local football park for Kispest, Puskás and Jozsef Bozsik — the middle son of five boys — had been inseparable best friends as the game's allure spoke over their lives and early on developed a signaling system of wall knocks to indicate 'How about a soccer game?' Brought up with the roar of the Kispest crowd in his ears, both had risen through the youth, junior and senior levels at the local football club, Kispest, almost simultaneously and graduated to the varsity national team just a year and a half apart in 1945 and 1947 respectively. With Puskás at Honvéd (The Army sponsored 'Homeland Defenders'), there he joins men on a star-spangled team with Sándor Kocsis, keeper Grosics, defender Gyula Lóránt and wingers László Budai and Czibor already involved, and showed players manifesting greatness and speeded their stride to set up Honvéd as the world's best club side and on another level make Hungary the rainmaking footballing Avalon of a good part of the 1950s — which rejoiced in setting up a garden of explosively uniting paths that most everyone saw reaching a climax in the 1954 World Cup Final.


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Joszef Bozsik singing autographs on the return trip from the 'Match of the Century'.
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Bozsik's soulful studied play and often loud intensity was known more for a focused glowering intelligent playmaking than scoring goals that telepathically came into Puskas' game with an emphatic closeness since their first youth games almost twenty years before amid more hardscrabble times of the inter-war period. Puskas himself, who had played with and against the very elites of the game, described Jozsef Bozsik as "the greatest player I ever saw or knew", and Bozsik later became the most durably featured bona fide ironman and tailoring choreographer in Hungary's footballing history, going onto to captain Hungary after Puskas' departure up until 1962 with 101 made appearances, the country's most ever. Bozsik had been the authentic penetrating power who mentally tests out all possible versions in peppering the ball impeccably up and down the field and sweepingly side to side who was a major thread in the bright weave of the team whose reading of the game was at its highest level.


In leading Hungary to three World Cups in 1954, 1958, 1962, Jozsef Bozsik sifted, coordinated, and battens the squad by projecting numberless completions through defenses with scrupulous attention to detail and performed an enormous labor in helping compose sixty-seven victories in his career. Midfield's compass showing no slackening of vigor, Bozsik sedulously strikes out new paths in explaining matches penetratingly. He is the great equalizer of his age and football land supplying what wants supplying and checks what wants checking, he is a seer, he is a joiner, a uniter of here and there, attack and defense corroborate themselves to him. People expect of Bozsik to indicate the path as an edifice in midfield to put a solid address on the match who perceives the beauty of the game well enough. And for fifteen years in his country's service Jozsef Bozsik was a veritable anthem for Hungarian football.



With perhaps some seeing less than there was to Jozsef Bozsik since his playing on an team behind the Iron Curtain and on the cusp of the viability of television as one of the most underrated special players ever at the peak of his virtuous creative powers, the radius of influence of the great Jozsef Bozsik was very large on results and retired with lasting elegance as a truly charmed soul whose esteem remains robust. An ode to the engineer's joys, a mightier centre Hungary has not seen.

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Gyula Grosics: World's First Modern Goalkeeper & Hall of Famer

grosics Gyula 1.jpgTo fully feel the wonder of the Magical Magyars, one would need to look to discover their matches were worked with a defense that did also show a similar vitality, ostensibly re-formed where high modernism had been pushed farthest; and the great Gyula Grosics exemplifies one such set of men who sought novel ways to preserve control and write larger losses for other teams that made people realize that he was a virtuoso who introduced to the world a goalkeeping stagecraft of succeeding revelations.


One hardly expects to find a spirited defense at the heart of the Magical Magyars, but forged by tedious discipline, the old firm around Gyula Grosics was exactly that. What may have happened often on history's most fulsomely hailed lines that felt utterly powerful moving forward but left unstable at the defensive stern, a man of surefire appeal made stable. In the 1950s, Grosics became the appropriate first symbol for modern goalkeeping.


At a no less passionate level ran a subsidiary concern for a solid structure in defense that could also bind the most promising attacking teams. Which is to say the Hungarians were among the leaders in being able to put up considerable resistance in their half, their great offense was compounded by a very good defense. One man more than any other defender was responsible for bringing a string of victories to the historic junction of the 1954 World Cup Final, Gyula Grosics, who was simultaneously the archetypal and the most daring goalkeeper of his day. He was was too original of a keeper for his age who accomplished great feats with the team from 1947 onward to 1962 that made him a leading performer of many parts supplying thwarting power in goal that encouraged his colleagues in their own grandiosities at the bow of the game.


Grosics got his start in the national team in August 1947 during a brief budding of Hungarian democracy right after the war and seven years on had reached iconic status as one to ensphere the team into peerless hands. From his very first game in August 1947 and entering the 1954 World Cup Final match itself, Grosics' Midas touch and invincible trend held of he who had sequenced thirty-three games under the bar without defeat. As Grosics went, they conquered with him as the unfailing safeguard against any and all errors that might otherwise impede the team and won the day in 30 out of 33 official contests he started with the team quadrupling the score of their opponents.






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If not having been defeated by any team means the truest definition of a goalkeeper, Gyula Grosics would earn top billing heading into the 1954 World Cup Final.

The profession of goalkeeping of the Magical Magyars tread the path of an experimental enterprise that defined itself in part as a daring deeds venture that empowered Gyula Grosics' best work. It was by way of Gyula Grosics' introduction the goalkeeping arts were unpinioned with the right aspect of gumption that oversaw an abolition of old limitation from the days when keeping goal strictly meant holding under the bar, full stop. More directly, Grosics confronts problems inherent when in the normal course of events with so much of the emphasis placed on the upfront group, oftentimes that included six players at once, counter-attacks, through and long balls gashed swathes across a thinly settled bloc of defenders zoning midfield as a defense that walks amid pitfalls and standing in need of revision. So a necessity of a rethink in the position was needed for obvious reasons, and forever goalkeeping would be approached differently by the borrowings the sport took from him.


With an air of precaution and to build snugly a sufficient thrust in defense, two of the sideward fullbacks (defenders) Buzanszky and Lantos hugged the edges of midfield to quickly nip counter-attacks and became football's first two pioneering adventuresome fullbacks. Constantly on the lookout for blind spots, when pressed, it required all of Grosics to draw full measure on his athleticism and farsighted vision to deter attacks by intervening into the game as an runner off the line when entering wedges dented and parted the backline. Thanks to Grosics' pioneering derring-do style that was able to withstand, get ahead and put the cautionary breaks on most attacking teams to make his business sure, a long series world-class results were ensured. Unlike anyone before him, Grosics kept attackers off balance with his darting, rousing runs outside the penalty box to pin down the oncoming onset before it could gather into a serious goal-producing attack. To bridge the gap and provide healing distance with his bolstering sorties, the defense gained thereby, permitting time for it pull around Grosics that most cannot break into. This changed attitude in goalkeeping following closely on the heels of the wayfaring Grosics would preoccupy the forward styles of succeeding goaltenders' efforts that partake of a newer, more active, and more universal pattern. Gyula Grocsis' proactive transitional can-do style, a fashion being somewhat untrodden before, unveiled one corner of the game's mysteries and deserves its reputation as a turning point from the reigning traditions of goalkeeping to what we see today. Gyula Grosics brings to near perfection the goalkeeping art that pointed the way for later defenses to a new acquired wisdom at last and was a real innovation of the twentieth-century.


In games where Grosics was the starter, defenders had given their best to deflect plays and merely conceded an average of 1.02 goals per game (44 matches). Reflecting faith not worn lightly of one of the surest defensive teams one could wish for, the team seemed to catalyze some sort of footballing perfection as the province around Gyula Grosics was restyled into a unassailable forecastle at the stern. Mr. Grosics would befittingly earn the FIFA Golden Glove Award at the 1954 World Cup and take his team to World Cups in 1958 and 1962.


The following is a catalogue of Gyula Grosics' career games, from his first international match to the breakup of the Golden Team circa Oct. 23, 1956. In 43 matches Grosics suffered 1 defeat in ten years of national service during the era of the Magical Magyars.




Date

Venue

Type

Opp. Team

Goals Against

Goal Support

1

8.20.1947

Home

friendly

Albania

0

3

2

10.12.1947

Away

friendly

Romania

0

3

3

9.19.1948

Away

friendly

Poland

2

6

4

10.3.1948

Home

friendly

Austria

1

2

5

10.24.1948

Away

friendly

Romania

1

5

6

6.4.1950

Away

friendly

Poland

2

5

7

9.24.1950

Home

friendly

Albania

0

12

8

10.29 1950

Home

friendly

Austria

3

4

9

11.12 1950

Away

friendly

Bulgaria

1

1

10

5.27.1950

Home

friendly

Poland

0

6

11

5.18.1950

Home

friendly

East Germany

0

5

12

6.15.1952

Away

friendly

Poland

1

5

13

6.22.1952

Away

friendly

Finland

1

6

14

7.15.1952

Neutral

1952 Olympics

Romania

1

2

15

7.21.1952

Neutral

1952 Olympics

Italy

0

3

16

7.24.1952

Neutral

1952 Olympics QF

Turkey

1

7

17

7.28.1952

Neutral

1952 Olympics SF

Sweden

0

6

18

8.2.1952

Neutral

1952 Olympics F

Yugoslavia

0

2

19

9.20.1952

Away

Gero Intl. Cup

Switzerland

2

4

20

4.26.1952

Home

friendly

Austria

1

1

21

5.17.1953

Away

Gero Intl Cup Final

Italy

0

3

22

7.5.1953

Away

friendly

Sweden

2

4

23

10.4.1953

Away

friendly

Czechoslovakia

1

5

24

10.11.1953

Away

friendly

Austria

2

3

25

11.15.1953

Home

friendly

Sweden

2

2

26

11.25.1953

Away

friendly

England

3

6

27

2.12.1954

Away

friendly

Egypt

0

3

28

4.11.1954

Away

friendly

Austria

0

1

29

5.23.1954

Home

friendly

England

1

7

30

6.17.1954

Nuetral

1954 World Cup

South Korea

0

9

31

6.20.1954

Nuetral

1954 World Cup

West Germany

3

8

32

6.27.1954

Neutral

1954 World Cup QF

Brazil

2

4

33

6.30.1954

Nuetral

1954 World Cup SF

Uruguay

2

4

Defensive and Offensive Scoring Averages on the Eve of the 1954 World Cup Final match:
Winning Percentage: 95.45%
Undefeated Percentage: 100%
1.06 gl/gm
4.45 gls/gm

34

7.4.1954

Neutral

1954 World Cup F

West Germany



35

9.19.1954

Home

friendly

Romania

1

5

36

9.26.1954

Away

friendly

Soviet Union

1

1

37

10.10.1954

Home

friendly

Switzerland

0

3

38

10.24.1954

Home

friendly

Czechoslovakia

1

4

39

11.14.1954

Home

friendly

Austria

1

4

40

9.16.1956

Away

friendly

Yugoslavia

1

3

41

9.23.1956

Away

friendly

Soviet Union

0

1

42

10.7.1956

Away

friendly

France

1

2

43

10.14.1956

Away

friendly

Austria

0

2

44
9.15.1957
Away
World Cup Qualif.
Bulgaria
1

2

Defensiv e and Offensive Averages in 43 starts { 39 Wins, 4 Draws, 0 Loss } ==== Winning Percentage: 95.35%====
Undefeated Percentage: 100.00%

0.977 gl/gm

4.05 gls/gm

The games against the Soviet Union on May 24th and 27th 1952 was played against a ' Moscow Select XI ' therefore it is not an official international match and will not be included in the statistics. Moreover, the referee in the match was from the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union would be officially recognized and sanctioned by FIFA in 1954 .


The Vaunted Magical Magyar Defense: left-back Lantos (' Miska '), right-back Buzanszky (' Kazal') , center-back Lorant, defensive wing-half Zakarias ( ' Zaki ')

Lantos.jpgjeno buzanszky.jpgLorant.jpgZakarias.jpg

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The pillars of the Golden Team's three fullback defense, Jeno Buzanszky, the stalwart rock in the center, Lorant, and Lantos.

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The great Jenő Buzánszky (Dombovar, May 4, 1925 - Esztergom, Jan. 11 2015) was the last surviving member of the great Magical Magyars with two great Hungarian Olympians. Jenő Buzánszky with Ms. Katalian Makray, Ex-First Lady of Hungary and Mr. Pal Schmidt, Ex-President of Hungary at the Silver Rose Ball at the Grand Opera, Budapest, 2014.
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The Producer: Manager Gustav Sebes and the Birth of 'Modern Football'

FOOTBALL became athletically and intellectually modern as the changes engendered by the advances made by the Hungarians spread over the Continent and beyond in the 1950s and after. Of the crowds of great football teams who came and went, Gusztáv Sebes's Golden Team of the 1950s was perhaps peerlessly the best of them all.

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Hungary manager Gusztáv Sebes, one of the 20th Century's winningest managers with 49 wins, 11 draws and 6 defeats, and brainchild behind the team. Sebes also chaired the committee overseeing the creation of UEFA in 1954, becoming Vice President of UEFA from 1954 to 1960.


Of persons arrived at high places, the team for managers began with Gusztáv Sebes, a beloved and cultivated person who had been a trade union organizer in Budapest and pre-war Paris at Renault car factories and was accorded a political clean bill of health to run affairs as the Deputy Sports Minister. Patronage by the communists and coming on with good connections, he knead his socialist credentials to a new formulaic style; and seeking a powerful ensemble through it, caused world football to witness ‘socialist football' in its prime. His was a team game that would brush aside an assortment of individuals for six years to set milestones not set before or since.


Sebes boldly affirmed that his 'socialist football ' perfectly revealed the 'total-team' concept as the game turned away from reverence for tradition toward a glorification of tactical change that shocked the old long-lived powers with smashing successes, his team a medium of special importance through which football took on its modern gleam. No team in history before had exhibited the scoring vibrancy of the Magical Magyars and at speeds that amazed contemporary observers, and dramatically informed the obvious and drastic reconstitution of football that swelled the limits of the game and raised the skyline of Hungarian sport.


In fact, Sebes was a system-maker who made his mark as a brilliant pioneer and macro-manager who along the way must have shared the belief in the finite or infinite (depending on your point of view) perfectibility of the game; and as one could have, was gifted a near perfect winning Über-team that came to life that lost one match over the course of six years due to no reasons of his own or his team following a number of bizarre unhoped for happenings and cover-ups that deprived his team to be looked upon with general acceptance as the greatest of them all in the 20th century.



On July 4 1954, in the World Cup Final match, his players are characters out of a long unwritten about scandal who demand to be given dramatic and rightful existence as 'world champions' with the game's sense of uncompleted action for initiating the question of where doping plays a part in championship-level integrity as well putting on the table a series of unasked questions as his team was sapped by two devastating officiating calls in the 1954 World Cup Final when in the early minutes walked a dozen superb persons to an apparent world title victory.



Just when Sebes' team seemed titled and confirmed, that mythic game will pronounce between a story of sunk magnificence and sure mastery, arriving inches scant of a superlative 5-3 to 6-2 Hungarian victory as three balls struck the post and the crossbar against the West German national team. Much as the 1954 World Cup Final seemed to have been decided for all time, the match's significance in 2010 is shown up to be mere brightening fantasy for West Germany with convicting evidence of systematic doping quietly sanctioned by leading figures in sports institutions in West Germany that lay unmentioned for five decades.



Sebes wished, however, to do more than understand the game, he wished to change it, and drew insight from the past that tell of a time some years before his own. The views Sebes held were rooted in the phenomenal success of other great teams two decades before, namely Vittorio Pozzo, who won famous victories for Italy and Hugo Meisl of Austria. While receptive to past currents he went many steps further as a management herald of a new age. Sebes himself originated an observation that only in fusing a flexible base and adopting a positive, complex passing plan could football more completely realize itself and bring tactics to an besetting position and this permeated his work root and branch. Moreover, Sebes' efforts were possessed by the quest to mirror and emulate the same as Pozzo and Meisl, principally to conscript into two core clubs the best players that country and history had bequeathed him and be the principal source of transmission for his national eleven that made possible several levels of reform simultaneously and helped achieve that union of passion, technique and imagistic precision. But above it all, the theme of all Sebes' goals were human relationships who learned to see his experiments making flourish a rejuvenated football culture as though football was a body of truths he needed to unearth. It is there a story that has the re-birth of football everywhere in view which would admit the whole triumphant answer for the sport, make Hungarian football delightfully enhanced and be the sport's measure of all things.



His main object was to command the best talents of the day as seen through a single team and to make them believe as he did: to present an example of socialism in action—that was football! Sebes hoped his style and content would inspire his countrymen, renew their sense of common destiny and seal his team's determination to rule the world, his team idealized by the nation's own admiration. He also probably intended to show that Hungary during its glorious football reign had produced men as great as the greatest as the now dominant Germans, Italians and Brazilians. Fortunately for him and for the footballing world, among those who lent themselves to his purposes were several players of many-sided genius.


As their fame steadily grew around them for a remarkable lineage of six years, the team known variously abroad as the "Mighty", "Magnificent" or "Magical Magyars", or simply and affectionately as the "Golden Team" in Hungary, was thrust upon audiences with a major box-office appeal.



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Hungary's No. 9, Nándor Hidegkuti, nicknamed "The Old Man" (active 1945-1962), debuting as international football history's first scoring "playmaker", a deep-lying center forward.

Sebes says he composed his new movement governed by the idea that a communal solving of players equally sharing in the ball's forward propagation then dovetailing all players into defense when needed for a mutual advantage would be expanded channeling of the game that would stand as an advance for football. He played freely around with experiments, forcing his mind through channels of deductions that drove him to work and rework the game's dialogue for rhythmical perfection. Logically with a dose of reform motive, football, according to Sebes, can probably best be discovered through its activity form where attack and defense were inseparable and mutually intelligible in one unifying operation. Sebes fathered the theory that it would be this fusion of tactics suggested by the mutual reinforcing dependence of attack and defense that were all of a piece were worked out sometime between 1948 and 1950 by the "father of modern football", Gustav Sebes, during a doctrinaire and the most extravagant and cavalier age of football.



If we compare Gusztáv Sebes' careful creation to the prevailing standard what first strikes us as new is the craft and team-centered quality of his work that looked forward to a splendid recognition from football posterity. For his men football was their stage, and the forces ruling its actors and sophisticates were wise, temperate and congenial ones from backstage, the collective portrait was conceived as a locus of liberty among men in the most reasonable and enjoyable of worlds. This freedom is a splendid privilege and from this mint issued teams that became glowing vehicles of modern football that allowed anything well done to prosper so that victories might then be produced at will.



Proud of their abilities, Sebes in these years favored the extension of power to more of his players than had any in the past. He was wise enough to encourage his players to abandon strict positional roles that he identified as a bottleneck to give rise to a no-limit ambiance with the team larger than the sum of its parts in a sort of catalytic alchemy. Under his leadership, the team was one of the first to communicate a new triangle-based passing offense among an arsenal of other maneuvers with players taking pride to unselfishly sail into teams with a quantum of esprit de corps and was able to express football in ways with a deeper elemental fellowship than ever before; they were a lordly and honorable society and Sebes brings together an environment that worked for a good understanding and cohesion between players, giving first place to the values of friendship to emancipate his team from the attitudes of the majority.



Most of all, Sebes needed the right available players to make it work. To help start and favor that growth and best articulate that quest, he required the right local and national political permissions to lure into two club centers (Honved and MTK) to anchor the very best Hungarian football had to offer as a testing place, thereby binding them firmly to his cause by gathering them together in a group of unparalleled amplitude and forming them into a poised ensemble. These liaisons and rich connections from Honved and MTK made the nucleus of the national team which was a finishing school for all graces of body and mind. Here knowledge is mastery of technique and craft, talents and the limits of physical capacities were harmonized in actual creative activities and freed a gallery of distinct, worldly, vivid individuals who became the worthiest players in the world. Clearly such a galaxy of talent, working at a level just short of supreme, has held the stage ever since.


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The incorruptible admiral on a white horse, Hungary's national conservative regent Admiral Miklos Horthy (1869-1957) from 1919-1944 in Royal Hungary. Admiral Horthy achieved worldwide fame in May of 1917 at the head of the Austro-Hungarian navy from his outgunned flagship SMS Novara in the Adriatic: with only eight ships and difficult circumstances and under the threat of twelve main enemy ships and forty-seven drifters, he brilliantly outmaneuvers and miraculous defeats a vastly larger fleet. With a lifelong admiration for England, he traveled the world and won international military tournaments in fencing and tennis as a young man, and was a very good bridge player. No less a man than James Joyce, the great Irish writer, was his English teacher. Horthy was the source of the various Hungarian obscenities in Joyce's novel Ulysses, one of the 20th century's foremost novels. It was during the Horthy era that most members of the Magical Magyars began their careers.


In time, this exclusively Hungarian team were garlanded in patriotic odes and music honoring the wisdom and just design of the socialist system and were shown in cinema theaters playing in faraway places or at home that ennobled the ideal persons. This was during a time of fear, repression, mistrust and unreasoning blind faith in a socialized economy and the austere life under the firm discipline and complete submission to the morally dubious whims of communist political bosses. This period, for all its rigidity, saw some remarkable exceptions for a number of reasons in the range of sport. Whether the communist authorities admitted it or not, the team was authentically a Hungarian one; most all of the players grew up and took up their careers playing in a free Royal Hungary during the powerful regency of Admiral Miklos Horthy (whom the people acquired as a strong and eloquent champion in 1919) or during the brief budding of democracy right after the war, but it was thoroughly socialist in formulation after 1949 that says much about the measure of Sebes' strength of inheritance.



For a start, the attack that was enlivened with the players swinging in free-flowing style toward opponents' goal did not liken to a ' line formation ' but laid down a more fluid checkered pattern where space was created to play the ball into by changing lane assignments to find perfect pieces of land and to fabricate confusion that was simply about twenty years ahead of its time: for example if Kocsis drifted wide Bozsik moved into the center, if the right-winger Budai moved inside then defending right-back Buzanszky overlapped Budai's original position, if Hidegkuti advanced upfield, Puskas dropped back and so on, and in this way with its striking degree of overlap prefaced the first edition of "Total Football".

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As Jozsef Boszik looks on, right winger Laszlo Budai swings into action against Romania, Sept 19. 1954 in the Nation's Stadium in Budapest. Hungary would go onto to win 5-1.

Entirely prolific, almost grandiose, the tactical shape was pursued mainly through and received its rhythm from the modulus or golden section of four players: inside-left Puskas, inside-right Kocsis, well seconded by the withdrawn center-forward Hidegkuti, and attacking wing-half Bozsik poised in the middle were the players that carried on the tide in the inner life of the offense that heralded a realm of unreachable attacking football which proclaimed the team most boldly. They were linked to Czibor on the left wing with his gleaming runs and the rightly used Laszlo Budai at wide right that obviously gave more choice. At full tide the sublimest part of the great six would form the consistence of what is to be from what had been. This winsome approach was truly appreciated and became internationally famous and visually studied and appraised by European experts who came to see the new tactics at work. Judged by the standards of the game in its time, it was found it to be quite revolutionary that looked so natural to the prevalent eye but were seldom seen before. Thus tactics were now more in a modern hand with the way that players could overlap into areas and meander unrecognizably in view of the known mode of football to impart a new fluid mannerism to the sport that proved so daring in their day that this vividly sketched the foreword, in effect, to "Total Football" where individual roles in zonal positions should not be strictly predefined.


For Sebes, midcentury modernism saw him as one of the inaugural managers at the vanguard of modern techniques to strengthen his players. Sebes insisted on applying what he considered up-to-date professional standards in training so that no team might hope obstruct the superior progress of his creation round the globe. He created amid the many blessings of his natural talents a physical engine that had a clean supercharged quality, a speed and pace fused to the spiritual bedrock of camaraderie that was conductive to outsprint, outpass, and outplay competitors and meticulously controlled in an air of solid confidence. The team he presided over was a verdant sanctuary, an athletic republic of free spirits living a charmed cocooned life and training as professionals inside a neuroses era of communist police repression and its continuing drive for sporting excellence.


As they went, his players fired rays of hope into millions of Hungarian hearts in odes to adventures in football, and men like Puskas, Koscis, Bozsik, Grosics, Hidegkuti and Czibor were authentic heroes for millions to embrace. With them combined, Sebes sorted his team through a clutch of big matches and left scores of masterpieces. Most teams, therefore, could not rise above their predicament of seeing and confronting the prodigy of famous men of the people doubtless getting near their goal and scoring more often than they themselves with goals that could not be got back, nor resolving the paradoxes of a team also that did not lack a conclusive defense. National teams seemed to founder and gasp to the tang of aptly turned passes, specialties and a prim defense that a sixty-game series hallowed their cause. They made newsworthy football look easy until one tries to play like the Hungarians and discovers how much care has gone into the choice of handling, placements of emphasis and quantity of thought.


Thus, from scene to scene, for six years the team played with an irresistible appeal with other sides unable to muster those qualities to oppose the pace of events just as games became superb demonstrations of new geometry and new laws of motion raised to the level of great, imaginative art. The team's ranking among the most important sides of history is due in great measure to the fact that present-day teams find themselves portrayed in it after they expanded in scope how the game should and could be played and their bestowals represents an enormous increment of knowledge as Sebes produced the form of football that many historians now define as "modern". The Golden Team was a living bridge from the classicism of the 'pyramid' and 'WM' systems and had spoken its prologue to the new cosmology in the footballing world, the 4-2-4 system.




The Influence of the Golden Team

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The great Ajax manager Istvan Kovacs (pictured below, born in Kolozsvar, Transylvania in 1920) guided Ajax to two very prestigious European Champion Cup titles in 1972 and 1973. In 1972 he won the Intercontinental Cup and also the first edition of European Supercup (1973), and achieved national titles in 1972, 1973 and the Dutch Cup in 1971-1972.

The impressive and novel features laid down by the Magical Magyars proved its worth in the modern setting and constituted a fascinating chapter in soccer history that is closely bound up with two footballing nations in particular, Brazil and Holland, where the cosmopolitan spirit held fast and who continued in the tradition of football protestantism which had given the Magical Magyars so many great figures. The same adaptability, but far wider, continued to prevail among the Brazilians in the late 1950s and into the 1970s. The breadth of this protestantism is imprinted upon five World Cup final matches. Brazilian and Dutch football would enter as heirs of Hungary's football estates in fame as beneficiaries of the 4-2-4 tactical shape and 'Total Football' that celebrated the dexterity and outré of the Hungarian players and their well-aimed attack in the 1950s Golden Team.


The Greatest Domestic Seasonal Clubs Of All-Time
World Rank
Year
Team
Rating
Manager
No. 1
1972
Ajax
9.54
Istvan Kovacs
No. 2
2011
Barcelona
9.53

No. 3
2011
Real Madrid
9.45

No. 4
2015
Barcelona
9.35

tie No. 5
2009
Barcelona
9.25

tie No. 5
2013
Bayern Munich
9.25

http://xtravictory.blogspot.com/2013/02/Season-Team.html

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Rediscovered in Holland following Hungarian precedents it took on a more influential turn derived in a general way from the pioneering work of Sebes two decades before. The famous 'Total Football' in the early 1970s lead by the Hungarian manager István Kovacs at Ajax would achieve dual wonders by a frank violation and democratization of football's natural laws that allowed for a considerable latitude for his players where maneuvers arose from equal parts impulse and discipline in a self-organizing process that was adapted to modern sophisticated use and that tended to put an immensely higher estimate on football potentialities and powers. Istvan Kovacs went in for accessible goals in imagistic attitudes at Ajax that offered the highest illustration of the cosmopolitan archetype of 'Total Football' in the Netherlands and was someone who wished to work the game at its limits, to redefine it. Kovacs found a liberal scope to their football that was mannered on previous aspects inaugurated by the Magical Magyars that was capable of great finesse and also of great boldness of imagination that Kovacs foresaw constituted the best hope for football and Ajax was its real and its greatest interpreter. Ajax were provided with a rich fare on the scoring end, Kovacs having signed such bold figures as Neeskens, Arie Haan, with Johan Cruijff, Johnny Rep and Dick van Dijk.


In the strictest sense, 'Total Football' at Ajax achieved a fully particularized setting as the archetypal verse libre game with a lucid style and broad limits whose durably valuable practitioners ran stellar distances and dizzying expanses who seemed to lose their traditional identities in the fullness of the easy pathos that Europe could not match. Long established and inherited European teams were blurred at the frontiers of this new mode and by the special touches that Kovacs added to Ajax's éclat. No conventional formation signposts were put up to tell observers where Ajax players should be on the pitch for it was believed by Kovacs and others to interfere with the immediacy of the impression and imposing an outdated standardization that no longer seemed desirable, a mode that required remarkable technical virtuosity from his players.


Kovacs, in his first season in the unsignposted territory of 'Total Football', completed a treble of the ultra-prestigious 1972 European Champions Cup, the Dutch national championship and a third consecutive KNVB Cup. In Kovacs' second season with the club, Ajax went on to win the 1972 Intercontinental Cup, retained their league trophy and won their third European Champions Cup, becoming the first club to win three consecutive European Cups since Real Madrid in the 1950s. For a brief period, Istvan Kovacs would stand atop golden hours as the high priest in the European footballing world. Such was the lively and rich carouseling sweep of this class that this brand of football became the dominant footballing culture of the Netherlands national team that would eventually reach World Cup championship matches in 1974 and 1978.



The Golden Team and their players directly influenced the game that saw their tactical system arrive to five World Cup championship matches:
Year
Nation
Hungarian Tactical Genre
Star Catalyst Players
Goal Diff (Tournament)
Highest Elo Rating in Tournament
1954
Hungary
"MW" formation, beta-4-2-4 & "Total Football" (socialist football)
Sandor Kocsis / Ferenc Puskas
+ 17 goals (all time high)
2191
1958
Brazil
4-2-4
Pele / Vava
+ 12 goals (tied for 3rd all time)
2102
1970
Brazil
4-2-4
Pele / Jairzinho
+ 12 goals (tied for 3rd all time)
2135
1974
Netherlands
"Total Football"
Cruyff / Neeskens
+ 12 goals (tied for 3rd all time)
2035
1978
Netherlands
"Total Football"
Neeskens / Rensenbrink
+ 5 goals
2064


Ferenc Puskas, as player or manager, is associated with six European Cup ('Champions League') title match appearances. Hungarian players and head managers have won the European Cup on seven occasions ( 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1972, 1973 ), and came in second place in the European Cup Finale four times ( 1961, 1962, 1964, 1971 ).

Year
Star Catalysts / Influencing Players or Manager
Team
Type of Championship Final
Opponent
1959
Alfredo di Stefano / Gento / Ferenc Puskas, players
Real Madrid
European Cup Fi nale
Stade de Reims
1960
Ferenc Puskas / Alfredo di Stefano / Gento, players
Real Madrid
European Cup Finale
Eintracht Frankfurt
1960
Ferenc Puskas / Alfredo di Stefano / Gento, players
Real Madrid
Intercontinental Cup Finale (inaugural)
Penarol, Uruguay
1961
Sandor Kocsis , Zoltan Czibor, Laszlo Kubala, players
Barcelona
European Cup Finale
Bela Guttmann , manager of Benfica
1962
Ferenc Puskas / Alfredo di Stefano / Gento, players
Real Madrid
European Cup Finale
Bela Guttmann , manager of Benfica
1964
Ferenc Puksas / Alfredo di Stefano / Gento, players
Real Madrid
European Cup Finale
Inter Milan
1966
Ferenc Puskas / Francisco Gento, players
Real Madrid
European Cup Finale
Partizan Belgrade
1971
Ferenc Puskas, head manager
Panathinaikos
European Cup Finale
Ajax
1971
Ferenc Puskas, head manager
Panathinaikos
Intercontinental Cup Finale
Nacional, Uruguay
1972
Istvan Kovacs, head manager
Ajax
European Cup Finale
Inter Milan
1972
Istvan Kovacs, head manager
Ajax
Intercontinental Cup Finale
Independiente, Argentina
1973
Istvan Kovacs, head manager
Ajax
European Cup Finale
Juventus
1973
Istvan Kovcacs, head manager
Ajax
European Super Cup Finale (inaugural)
Glasgow Rangers



Curriculum Vitae, Records & Statistics
Precedents:

  • First national side in the world to eclipse a 1888 Scottish record of being undefeated in 22 consecutive matches (31 games).
  • First national side in the world to record +30 undefeated matches consecutively (31 games).
  • First Old World team to win +10 games consecutively.
  • Maiden Victory: First national side in the world from outside the British Isles to defeat England at home since the codification of association football in 1863, a span of 90 years (Hungary v. England - Nov. 25, 1953)
    * Hungary's 7-1 defeat of England in Budapest in 1954 is still England's record defeat.
  • Maiden Victory: First non-South American national side to defeat Uruguay (Hungary 4 v. Uruguay 2, July 30, 1954) - a span of 52 years.
  • First national side to defeat Uruguay in a competitive match (1954 World Cup Semifinal) since 1924, breaking a 17 game Uruguayan unbeaten run against non-South American competition dating from May 26, 1924.
  • Maiden Victory: First national side to defeat the Soviet Union at home (Hungary 1 v Soviet Union Sept. 23, 1956) in a FIFA-sanctioned match.
  • First national side in history to simultaneously host in play the No. 1 and No. 2 world record holders for most goals scored internationally (Ferenc Puskás 84 goals, Sándor Kocsis 75 goals) from May 11, 1955 to October 14, 1956.
  • Maiden Victory: First national side to defeat the Italy national team at home in the Stadio Olympico (May, 1953).

World Records:

  • Strongest power rating ever attained in the sport's history using the Elo Rating System for national teams, 2192 points (set June 30, 1954).
  • Longest time undefeated for a major national team: 4 years 1 month (June 4, 1950 to July 4, 1954).
  • Most consecutive games scoring with at least one goal: 73 games (April 10, 1949 to June 16, 1957).
  • Most collaborative goals scored between two starting players (Ferenc Puskás & Sándor Kocsis) on same national side (158 goals).
  • Greatest Offensive and Balanced Team for goal differential during 60 game span (+3.12 goal diff/game).

20th Century Records:

  • Most International Goals: Ferenc Puskás (83 goals).
  • Least losses in a 50 game span (June 4, 1950 to Feb 19 1956) 42 victories, 7 draws, 1 defeat).

World Cup Records:

  • Highest average goal difference per match: +3.2 (1954).
  • Highest goal differential in a single World Cup finals tournament: +17.
  • Highest average goals scored per game in a single World Cup finals tournament: 5.4 goals/game
  • All-time: 2.72: Highest average of goals scored per match (inclusive of all World Cup Finals tournaments Hungary entered).
  • Highest margin of victory ever recorded in a World Cup finals tournament match ( Hungary 9, South Korea 0, - July 17, 1954).
  • Only team to achieve a +20 goal differential in World Cup history (8th minute to 10 minute: 1954 World Cup Final)
  • 27 goals scored in a single World Cup Finals tournament (1954)


World Cup Streaks:

  • Most consecutive matches scoring at least four goals: 4x, 1954 Hungary (four goals).
  • Most consecutive matches scoring at least six / eight goals: 2x, 1954 Hungary (8 goals).
  • Individual goalscoring: Most matches with at least two goals: 4x, Sándor Kocsis (1954 Hungary)
  • Individual goalscoring: Most consecutive matches with at least two goals: 4x, Sándor Kocsis (1954 Hungary).
  • Individual goalscoring: Most hat-tricks: 2x, Sándor Kocsis (1954 Hungary).
  • Individual goalscoring: Most consecutive hat-tricks: 2x, Sándor Kocsis (1954 Hungary).


[[cs:Zlatá jedenáctka]] [[de:Goldene Elf]] [[es:Equipo de oro]] [[eo:Orteamo]] [[fr:Onze d'or hongrois]] [[it:Squadra d'oro]] [[hu:Aranycsapat]] [[nl:Magische Magyaren]] [[ja:マジック・マジャール]] [[pl:Złota jedenastka]] [[pt:O Time de Ouro]] [[ru:Золотая команда]] [[sr:Златних једанаест]] [[fi:Kultainen joukkue]]






Part II: International Matches of the Magical Magyars





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A government portrait of cabinet ministers in free Royal Hungary during the early 1930s.
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Count Laszlo Almasy (1895-1951), the last of the great romantic geographic explorers, the principal character in the Oscar-winning film 'The English Patient'.
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Simply the greatest! Calvin Klein. Mr. Klein's father originally hailed from Hungary.

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József Törley (born 1858) in enchanting Hungarian national dress was a great entrepreneur and noble patriot nobleman who founded the famous Törley champagne company to mark and celebrate great events, good tidings, special occasions, anniversaries, winning national elections and Szilveszter (December 31, or New Years' Eve) according to old Magyar cultural virtues.
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Simply the greatest 19th Century Victorian Gothic horror novel ever written: Dracula written by Bram Stocker, published May 1897.
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The old legendary Hunnia Film Studios logo. Did you know... according to the Associated Press, (AP-NY-10-26-96) people with some claim to Hungarian ancestry have been nominated for Oscars 136 times since 1929, when the first ones were handed out, and have taken home more than 30 of the golden statuettes. The Hungarian-born founder of the Paramount Pictures Empire and Loew's Theatres also produced the world's first full-length motion picture. There's an old joke from the '30s about a sign on a movie studio wall reading: "It's not enough to be Hungarian. You have to have talent." The joke refers to how a relatively small country had such an impact on the history of the movies. Another sign above MGM's commissary wrote: "Just because you're Hungarian, doesn't mean you're a genius!"
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The 'Aranyvonat' (Goldtrain) in traditional Hungary during the Regency era in royal Hungary era that transported the 900 year old mummified right hand of King Saint Stephen, first Christian king of Hungary.

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Famed Hungarian actor Antal Pager (born in Mako, 1899 - Budapest, 1986) in a early mid-century fedora and business attire.


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The 'Paris of the East', the 'Pearl of the Danube', the 'Capital of Freedom', old romantic Budapest is a very ancient city, and is now considered a "Holy City" with its venerable pivotal and strategic past.
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Simply the greatest! The nectar of the Gods, the greatest wine in the world, the world renowned Tokaji Aszu. Delighted with the precious beverage, Louis XV of France offered a glass of Tokaji to Madame de Pompadour, referring to it as "Vinum Regum, Rex Vinorum" ("Wine of Kings, King of Wines"). Tokaji wine became the subject of the world's first appellation control, established several decades before Port wine, and over 120 years before the classification of Bordeaux.
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Simply the greatest! Absolute White Smoke! The greatest romantic film of all-time, arguably the greatest film ever made, directed by legendary Hungarian-American Hollywood director Michael Curtiz. It won three ultra-prestigeous Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, and Screenplay. Hollywood's No. 1 leading man, the icon Humphrey Bogart as Rick Blaine, the immortal Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid as Victor Laszlo, and the Hungarian-American Peter Lorre. Immortal Hollywood:-- "I'm saying it because it's true. Inside of us, we both know you belong with Victor. You're part of his work, the thing that keeps him going. If that plane leaves the ground and you're not with him, you'll regret it. Maybe not today, and maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the rest of your life.We'll always have Paris. We didn't have - we'd - we'd lost it until you came to Casablanca. We got it back last night. And you never will. I've got a job to do too. Where I'm going, you can't follow. What I've got to do, you can't be any part of. Ilsa, I'm no good at being noble, but it doesn't take much to see that the problems of three little people don't amount to a hill of beans in this crazy world. Someday you'll understand that. Now, now. Here's looking at you kid."
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The legendary silver screen icon, the lovely Hungarian Marika Rökk (3 November 1913 – 16 May 2004), who became famous in German films in active years from 1930 to 1988.
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Legendary silver screen icon, Bela Lugosi.
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Simply the greatest, the greatest illusionist, stunt performer, escape artist and magician who ever lived--Harry Houdini (born Budapest 1874).
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The incomparable American star Jayne Mansfield and husband Mickey Hargitay, Hungarian-American actor and Mr. Universe in 1955. During their marriage, Hargitay and Mansfield made four movies together.
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Simply the greatest! The original Tarzan, Johnny Weissmuller (born Szabadfalu, Transylvania Hungary, June 2, 1904 – Acapulco, Mexico, January 20, 1984) was a Hungarian-born American competition swimmer and actor best known for playing Tarzan in films of the 1930s and 1940s and for having one of the best competitive swimming records of the 20th century. Weissmuller was one of the world's fastest swimmers in the 1920s, winning five Olympic gold medals for swimming and one bronze medal for water polo. He won fifty-two U.S. National Championships, set more than fifty world records (spread over both freestyle and backstroke), and was purportedly undefeated in official competition for the entirety of his competitive career.
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One of the princes of Hollywood, Tony Curtis, whose parents came from Hungary.
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The great Academy winner, Paul Newman, one of the princes of Hollywood, whose parents hailed from Hungary.


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The famous MTK Budapest, formed in the magical year of 1888 and holder of 23 national titles. Innovations at MTK lead to the development of the deep seated third striker.

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The legendary and iconic Albrecht Dürer of the German Renaissance. His Hungarian father, Albrecht Dürer the Elder, was an esteemed goldsmith in Hungary, originally Ajtósi, who in 1455 had moved to Nuremberg from Ajtós, near Gyula in Hungary.
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The countess who perhaps would have become princess of Hungary had World War II not broken out, Ilona Edelsheim-Gyulai (Budapest, Hungary 1918 - Lewes, England 2013), was a Hungarian noblewoman and wife of István Horthy, son of Regent Miklós Horthy.


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The New York Yankees of Hungarian football, the iconic Ferencvaros, the most supported club in the land with 29 national championships.
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The famous Budapest Kispest-Honved outfit, the best club side in the world in the 1950s before the European Cup and emergence of Real Madrid; and instrumental in the creation of the European Cup in 1955.
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1972 USC (Univ. of California) Trojans, greatest collegiate football team all-time. 1972 Miami Dolphins, greatest professional American football team all-time.
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The great colors in the world, 'orange, white & green'.

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The best performing bullish stock market in Europe, the Hungarian BUX - up a radiant 27.20% 1 yr. return.

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Cutaway Drawing of the Millennium Underground in Budapest (1894–1896) which was the first underground in Continental Europe by Ganz Works.
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Know during difficult communist times as the "Drink of Freedom" the famous Zwack Unicum is a Hungarian herbal liqueur drunk as a digestif and apéritif. Invented by a Hungarian imperial court physician in 1790 as a digestive aid for the Emperor Joseph II (who cried, “Das ist ein unikum!” upon tasting it), Unicum is regarded as one of the national drinks of Hungary. With a secret formula including 40-odd herbs—passed down in the Zwack family from the beginning—it has a very rich history and tradition. It is also known as the "Hungarian National Accelerator", and the iconic green round bottles with the gold cross is symbolic of King Attila the Hun's war hammer.
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Simply the greatest!



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The Magical Magyars were continuously ranked as the world's No.1 team from the conclusion of the European Championship title match with Italy (May 17, 1953) to Sept 22, 1957.



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Glory to all the esteemed treasure hunters and archaeologists of the world! It is estimated the world's oceans contain approximately +60 billion dollars of sunken, underwater Spanish galleon gold, silver and priceless artifacts from a expansive glorious European period known in world history when it was exclaimed in Spanish possessions that "God is Spanish!" (1596-1626). In mainland Europe, the two 'holy grails' of archaeology is the location and excavation of Atlantis and King Attila the Hun's multilayered gold-silver-bronze hidden coffin located in Hungary, which contains 'The Sword of God/Sword of Mars'' (Magyar: Isten Kardja), which would be the most spectacular discovery since ancient Trojan treasures were unearthed.



"The Sword of God" "Sword of Mars"




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Utopia Realized. In Florida, America, where far and wide legends and myths of the 'Fountain of Youth' was fabled to be. The preamble to the real 'Fountain of Youth' was discovered in 1953 in Britain, sequenced by the ever-perfecting 'modern computer' invented by John Nuemann in 1945 and perfected in 1996 in America.